Search - Keb Mo :: Just Like You (Multichannel/Stereo)

Just Like You  (Multichannel/Stereo)
Keb Mo
Just Like You (Multichannel/Stereo)
Genres: Blues, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Keb' Mo's 1995 Grammy-winning eponymous debut firmly lodged the Los Angeles-born singer-guitarist in the contemporary blues pantheon. His sophomore effort, Just Like You, is slick in comparison to the virtuosic, bare-bones...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Keb Mo
Title: Just Like You (Multichannel/Stereo)
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony
Release Date: 1/21/2003
Album Type: Super Audio CD - DSD
Genres: Blues, Pop
Styles: Contemporary Blues, Electric Blues, Acoustic Blues, Modern Blues
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 074646731666

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Keb' Mo's 1995 Grammy-winning eponymous debut firmly lodged the Los Angeles-born singer-guitarist in the contemporary blues pantheon. His sophomore effort, Just Like You, is slick in comparison to the virtuosic, bare-bones Keb' Mo', but it's nevertheless an irresistible and accomplished album. While songs such as "Perpetual Blues Machine" and "You Can Love Yourself" are classic Mo', with their canny lyrics and facile slide and acoustic guitar licks, the sapfest "Just Like You" (with guests Bonnie Raitt and Jackson Browne) and the clichéd "The Action" are hard to stomach. Toward the end of the disc, however, the gospel-laced "Hand It Over" and folksy "Momma, Where's My Daddy" restore the faith, displaying once again Mo's marvelous talent for wrenching the heartstrings with simply his voice and soulful steel-guitar manipulations. --Rebecca Robinson

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CD Reviews

Review of a few reviewers
Thomas Danfield | CENTRAL COAST, CALIF. | 11/11/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"while not all of hardly any album or submission by an artist can be expected to please 100%, some of the negative i'm picking up in some reviews seems to come from the fact that Keb' doesn't sound like he "did," or "should." an artist is just that, and should be reaching out and pushing their limits, style and range. that doesn't always work out at the "box office," but it should be recognized for what it is and considered within that context, not some preconceived narrow definition based on art in the past. it's ok to dislike a piece or to feel indifferently about it. i think it's important to dig inside ourselves in order to have a meaningful sense of why and/or how we are affected by a piece. that is our responsibility as the viewer or listener of any art form. keep reaching, stretching and trying Keb'----i'll be there for the exploration.
t.d.
"