Search - Jolene :: Hell's Half Acre

Hell's Half Acre
Jolene
Hell's Half Acre
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

The popular comparison for Jolene's first album is early R.E.M. That might be unfair for Jolene--after all, the Athens boys were never quite this mature-sounding early on, and where Michael Stipe will reach for a falsetto,...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Jolene
Title: Hell's Half Acre
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Ardent Records
Release Date: 2/6/1996
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
Style: Adult Alternative
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 766887161226

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The popular comparison for Jolene's first album is early R.E.M. That might be unfair for Jolene--after all, the Athens boys were never quite this mature-sounding early on, and where Michael Stipe will reach for a falsetto, John Crooke is more likely to settle down into a flat, soulful rumble. Crooke's lyrics are easily distinguished, too, and he definitely has been around the block once or twice: "I could save the world, if given the go-ahead," he sings in "Alongside," before thinking better of it. "Then again, maybe I should save myself instead." But the comparison holds in other ways. Dave Burris does sound distinctly Mills-ian when he contributes backing vocals, and the two bands share the same love for Vic Chesnutt and for layered, subtly energetic melodies. Bill Ladd's consistent pedal steel, and a duet with Kim Richey, only underscore the depth present throughout. It's no surprise that they hail from the same area that spawned both the dBs and Let's Active a couple of revolutions back. --Randy Silver

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CD Reviews

"Farm fed and ridden with angst"
Scott (yatesks@winthrop.edu) | Charlotte, NC | 08/16/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"For the former HARDSoul Poets, this album was their first real shot at the national scene. Unfortunately, it failed to grab that attention largely due to mishandling by the label. The album itself is great. The songs create an atmoshpere of "the surreal dirty deep south." "Skyliners" is a kind of protest song against NC's own Jesse Helms. These rockers carry a twang on this album and got lumped into the Americana category because of it. They hate it. Check out "In the Gloaming" or a live show to get a truer taste for their sound. Regardless, this album still kicks and the songs will stick in your head just the same. Kim Richey duets on "I Read What You Wrote Today", John Crooke's take on his own southern romance."