Search - John Entwistle :: Rigor Mortis Sets in

Rigor Mortis Sets in
John Entwistle
Rigor Mortis Sets in
Genres: Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

1997 Repertoire reissue of The Who bassist's 1973 & third solo album. Tony Ashton assists on piano and Alan Ross givesa hand with guitars. Features all 10 original tracks, including a drastically different version of the '...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: John Entwistle
Title: Rigor Mortis Sets in
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Repertoire
Original Release Date: 1/1/2005
Re-Release Date: 7/16/2002
Album Type: Import, Original recording remastered
Genres: Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Style: Arena Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 4009910462126, 766482777426

Synopsis

Album Description
1997 Repertoire reissue of The Who bassist's 1973 & third solo album. Tony Ashton assists on piano and Alan Ross givesa hand with guitars. Features all 10 original tracks, including a drastically different version of the 'Who's Next' classic 'My Wife'. The album was first released on Track Records.

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CD Reviews

50 s' Rock & Roll from Who Bassist .
luile | Pan | 03/04/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"John Entwistle s' 1973 follow up album to his best one "Whistle Rymes" is a great Rock & Roll album and in addition to "My Wife", contains a song that could have been a smash hit for him: "Made in Japan". If you have a group and are lookin for a great song to cover, "Made in Japan", coulbe be a great hit for you. "Peg Leg Peggy" is another one to cover. If you are a fan his best solo are this one "Whistle Rymes" and his recent "Life for Dead". Hi also plays in another "lost" cd with Keith Moon, Kenny Jones and Alice Cooper among others "Flash Fearless and the Zorg Women"."
Probably the best retro rock 'n' roll lp from the 70's
J. Desimone | USA | 12/21/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is not the kind of lp you would play over and over for months, but you could plop it down 20 years later and still love it, like I have. That this lp came out when it did - at the height of the Who's touring with excruciating sound levels and in the post-Who's Next popularity explosion - is an interesting aspect. 50's Rock n Roll nostalgia was popping up all over, from Keith Moon's favorites ShaNaNa, the Beatles veering into the same territory during the Get Back period, Led Zep throwing Elvis and Ricky Nelson tunes into their shows, and though John Lennon's Rock N Roll Lp a bit after. Entwistle did them all better, and did it his way. He opens with the rip-roaring demand to Gimme That Rock N Roll, and there is no doubt about what it is he wants. And he wasn't getting it from arena-rock and a festering hippie culture. The jacket - featuring the gravesite and coffin of Rock N Roll (proclaiming it didn't really die, just faded away) tells the story to anyone who was paying attention. Modern 70s Rock, which he was making a fabulous living at, was devoid of all the fun that drew him into it 20 years before.

My Wife and Made In Japan are bookends for this dose of nostalgic Rock n Roll. They are a pair of great tunes and stand out as the only two that are Rock without the Roll, and to that end they fit in production-wise but not in the vibe of the disc. The tunes reflect his dark sense of humor and above all his reverence. He concocts solid doo-wop-ish tunes with lyrics that are downright warped without trashing the form, especially Roller Skate Kate, a classic dead girlfriend tune in the vein of Teen Angel, Tell Laura I Love Her, or Last Kiss. Peg Leg Peggy is a rocking tune, but the lyrics are about the dance stylings of an amputee. As arguably the planets baddest bass player, he tackles the 50s novelty rocker Mr Bassman. He could have ruined the song with a send-up that went overboard or twisted rearranging, but he does it his way which was not too far off the original. But of course that was sung by a girl originally, which he didn't try to send up. Elvis and Little Richard covers were mandatory, and he rips into them with an energy he didn't put on vinyl too often. He is true to the fun of 50s rock but not into a sound-alike vibe, which Keith Moon played around with.

There are a few 50s rock discs by 60s and 70s rock stars who wanted to pay tribute to the oldies, or run away from what was happening musically. This one is maybe the best of them, and a fascinating piece of Entwistle's (and the Who's) work. Great for anyone who wants to understand where the music came from. A great part of his early 70's trilogy, and a lot better than some of the stuff they would crank out a few years later."