Search - Joao Gilberto :: Amoroso & Brasil

Amoroso & Brasil
Joao Gilberto
Amoroso & Brasil
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop, Latin Music
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

Contained on one compact disc are two complete recordings by Brazilian singer and guitarist Joao Gilberto. — No Track Information Available — Media Type: CD — Artist: GILBERTO,JOAO — Title: AMOROSO/BRASIL — Street Release Date:...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Joao Gilberto
Title: Amoroso & Brasil
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Warner Bros / Wea
Release Date: 9/14/1993
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop, Latin Music
Styles: Caribbean & Cuba, Cuba, South & Central America, Brazil, Brazilian Jazz, Latin Jazz, Latin Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
Other Editions: Amoroso (Reis)
UPCs: 093624516521, 093624516545

Synopsis

Product Description
Contained on one compact disc are two complete recordings by Brazilian singer and guitarist Joao Gilberto.
No Track Information Available
Media Type: CD
Artist: GILBERTO,JOAO
Title: AMOROSO/BRASIL
Street Release Date: 09/14/1993

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CD Reviews

Amoroso/Brasil combines 2 of Joao Gilberto's best albums.
David (philbay@earthlink.net) | Olympia, WA | 07/13/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Joao Gilberto is a genius singer and the originator of Brazilian bossa nova. His double release Amoroso/Brasil combines 2 of of the best albums of his later career in one CD. The Amoroso section ('77) displays the tranquil, fluid perfection of Gilberto's vocals. The string arrangements are somewhat heavy, but well-composed and appropriate. Joao sings with a fascinating combination of vocal control and sensuality, as on a torrid version of "Besame Mucho". The syncopated skip of his vocal lines on Jobim classics such as "Wave" is breathtaking. Great music for slow, steamy dancing. The Brasil section ('80) is my favorite, because of a more samba style, lighter arrangements, and delightful guest vocals by Caetano Veloso, G.Gil and Maria Bethania. For enjoying soft, relaxed Brazilian music, this double album is the one of the very best."
Not the best Joao
jimboum | Paris, France | 04/28/2000
(2 out of 5 stars)

"Amoroso/Brasil is not really worth buying if you like Joao Gilberto's soft atmospheres ; there is too much orchestration on this record, and it's sad too see that Joao sounds better, much more evocative and sensual when he is alone with his guitar. Better buy Live in Montreux or Voz e violao..."
"Brasil" is essential
Idiosyncrat | California | 01/14/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This CD includes two of João Gilberto's albums: Amoroso (1977) on tracks 1-8, and the tiny Brasil (1981) from 9-14. I could assign this CD 5 stars simply in virtue of the second part; it is worth getting the whole CD just for those 6 tracks.I agree with the opinion below that Claus Ogerman's orchestral arrangements really do a disservice to Amoroso. To my ear, having heard many other of Gilberto's recordings, Ogerman just doesn't "get it"; his arrangements sometimes seem to me to undermine Gilberto's way of developing the song. For me the most annoying example is comparing "Zingaro" in this album with the live version in Gilberto's live Montreux CD (there it's titled "Retrato em Branco e Preto"). In the live version, João's interpretation builds up a lot of tension in the verses; in the studio version, Ogerman's arrangements utterly destroy this tension. Really, the only song where I think the orchestral arrangements adds anything is "Tin Tin Por Tin Tin". I my João Gilberto stars scale, Amoroso gets three stars (which translates into about four stars in my lesser artists scale).The second album included in the CD, Brasil, is a whole another story. This has got to be some of the gentlest and most delightful music ever recorded. On this album Gilberto is accompanied by fellow Brazilian stars Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil and Maria Bethania. This album is very fundamentally about the contrast between the voices; the most common arrangement is to have them take turns in singing the verses of the song one after the other, almost impossibly softly, each with their own subtly different phrasing. In the context of this incredibly quiet album, the phrasing differences stand out quite dramatically for those who listen for them. One really gets to hear these familiar people's voices in a new way by juxtaposing them. (I can imagine, however, that familiarity with the artists helps in appreciating this album.)"