Search - James Reese Europe :: Hell Fighters

Hell Fighters
James Reese Europe
Hell Fighters
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (24) - Disc #1

James Reese Europe was the world's most accomplished black bandleader before 1920. he was internationally famous as the founder of New York's Clef Club, and as music director for Vernon and Irene Castle. During World War I...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: James Reese Europe
Title: Hell Fighters
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Memphis Archives
Original Release Date: 11/12/1996
Re-Release Date: 11/19/1996
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Swing Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 781371702020

Synopsis

Album Description
James Reese Europe was the world's most accomplished black bandleader before 1920. he was internationally famous as the founder of New York's Clef Club, and as music director for Vernon and Irene Castle. During World War I, he organized and led the all-black 369th U.S. Infantry "Hell Fighters" Band. They fought in the trenches, introduced that new music "Jazz" to the Continent, and were acclaimed in France and America as the greatest-ever regimental band. In May, 1919, the "Hell Fighters" were on the last leg of their triumphal U.S. victory concert tour when Europe was murdered at age 39. All 24 recordings he made for Pathe in the last two months of his life are collected on this CD as well as a 44 page booklet with rare photographs and liner notes.
 

CD Reviews

The transitional music mostly hints at jazz
The Dixieland Man | 10/26/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Shortly after the IAJRC label came out with a CD reissuing all of the music recorded by James Reese Europe's unusual band during their four 1919 sessions, Memphis Archives put out a CD with the exact same material. The difference between the sets is that while IAJRC put out the material in strict chronological order, Memphis Archives instead chose to simulate a Europe concert. The liner notes of course differ greatly on these two competing sets, and the edge is given to Memphis Archives for Tim Gracyk's very extensive essay. The transitional music mostly hints at jazz but does not contain much improvisation. Europe's brand of dance music occupied its own category, including some Noble Sissle vocals, marching music, rags, waltzes, novelties and future jazz standards, and either of his sets (recorded just a short time before his murder) are recommended. Now if only Europe's eight groundbreaking titles of 1913-1914 would be reissued"