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Baby Don't You Tear My Clothes
James Cotton
Baby Don't You Tear My Clothes
Genres: Blues, Pop
 
Although throat surgery has curtailed James Cotton's singing career, it has opened up avenues for the Chicago harpist to expand his approach. Guest vocalists Rory Block, Marcia Ball, and Bobby Rush maintain the goodtime bl...  more »

      

CD Details

All Artists: James Cotton
Title: Baby Don't You Tear My Clothes
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Telarc
Release Date: 5/25/2004
Genres: Blues, Pop
Styles: Chicago Blues, Contemporary Blues, Electric Blues, Modern Blues, Harmonica Blues
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 089408359620

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Although throat surgery has curtailed James Cotton's singing career, it has opened up avenues for the Chicago harpist to expand his approach. Guest vocalists Rory Block, Marcia Ball, and Bobby Rush maintain the goodtime blues feel Cotton is known for, but it's the influence of others that pushes this album into new territory. Dave Alvin growls through a rootsy "Stealin', Stealin'" while country singer-songwriter Jim Lauderdale adds twang to Sam Cooke's "Bring It on Home to Me." Bluegrass legend Doc Watson offers his distinctive high, lonesome vocals to "How Long Blues" and Peter Rowan's yodels reverberate through a sassy "Muleskinner Blues." C.J. Chenier takes the proceedings down to Louisiana for a soulful, accordion-spiced version of Slim Harpo's "Rainin' in My Heart." Even with all the high-profile guests, Cotton never seems like a sideman on his own album. His gutsy, unamplified harp is featured prominently, and all the elements combine to make this a classy and eclectic entry into Cotton's distinguished catalog. --Hal Horowitz

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CD Reviews

Wonderful records he did when he was a complete superstar
Arthur Shuey | Wilmington, NC USA | 01/30/2006
(2 out of 5 stars)

"Baby Don't You Tear My Clothes
James Cotton
Telarc Records CD-83596
www.telarc.com
Just can't love it. It isn't that it isn't world class Chicago blues harmonica, but that it's not as good as anything James Cotton did before throat cancer took his voice, because it doesn't have his powerful, downhome vocals and "Got to th'ow down right now" phrasing alongside the harmonica wizardry. Instead, it has a touch of what must have been extremely painful Cotton vocals and a lot of big name guest singing that, to this critic, puts James Cotton in a sideman role he is too good for.
Honor James Cotton. Honor him by buying the string of wonderful records he did when he was a complete superstar."