Search - Georges Bizet, Pietro Mascagni, Ruggero Leoncavallo :: Intermezzo

Intermezzo
Georges Bizet, Pietro Mascagni, Ruggero Leoncavallo
Intermezzo
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (17) - Disc #1


      
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CD Reviews

A Great Intro to Some of Opera's Orchestral Moments
12/20/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Some of opera's (or related stage works') best orchestral moments are included on this CD. Starting with the joyous Prelude to Carmen and ending with the tour de force of the Dance of the Hours, this CD has it covered, at least as well as any near eighty minute CD can. If you are not familiar with classical music, this is a great opener. None of the tracks are "hard" to listen to- they just gracefully take you off to another world. For beginners make sure you listen to the Intermezzo from Cavalleria Rusticana, Barcarolle from The Tales of Hoffman, Dance of the Hours from La Giocanda [I promise you, you will know it], and Meditation from Thais [no matter how supposedly "overplayed" it is, it is still one of the most beautiful songs], and Prelude to Carmen. For beginners and seasoned music aficionados [which I do not pretend to be], I beg you to listen to Interlude from Notre Dame by Schmidt. This is one of the most surprising songs on the entire CD. Very nice and every bit as enjoyable as the most popular ones. This piece is not often found on other CDs; thank goodness Naxos included it. For those with massive CD collections the few dollars you spend on this CD is worth Interlude from Notre Dame, and for the beginner, you will not find a better group of famous and not-so-famous songs."
Nicely thought out program...
vmzfla | Orlando, Fl. | 02/08/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This one disc contains many of the most beloved orchestral excerpts from opera(Sorry, no Wagner). They are competently played by a variety of NAXOS's usual roster of artists and orchestras. As I have stated before!
The NAXOS producers seem to include not so typical repetoire on most of their compilations. The lush interlude from Schmidts "Notre Dame" is a gem. Strauss's little known "1001 Nights" gives us a Viennese twist on the Arabian fantasy. The gushing brass of the introduction to Stenhamar's interlude to the "Song" leaves us wanting for more. Sure, you don't get Karajan or Bernstein like performances, but the disc as a whole is worth the budget price asked. Recording quality varies from track to track, good to excellent."