Search - Habib Khan :: Journey on the Strings

Journey on the Strings
Habib Khan
Journey on the Strings
Genres: World Music, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

Journey on the Strings incorporates deep Indian instrumentation in a fusion environment. Recorded in a live setting, Ustad Habib Khan on sitar plays some of the most beautiful melodies, riding on the powerful rhythm patte...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Habib Khan
Title: Journey on the Strings
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: X Dot 25
Release Date: 11/20/2001
Album Type: Live
Genres: World Music, Pop
Styles: India & Pakistan, India
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 759145101324

Synopsis

Album Description
Journey on the Strings incorporates deep Indian instrumentation in a fusion environment. Recorded in a live setting, Ustad Habib Khan on sitar plays some of the most beautiful melodies, riding on the powerful rhythm patterns of two master percussion musicians of Indian decent; Pandit Swapan Chaudhuri on Tabla and Pandit Vikku Vinayakram on Gatham. Pandit Ramesh Misra on Sarangi also performs melody and accompaniments on this one of a kind performance of a sitting with indian master musicians. Perter Block adds special flavor to this performance with his mesmerizing flute performances. Style/Genre: World/Indian Fusion Instrumentation: Sitar, Tabla, Ghatam, Sarangi, Flute & Bass, Percussion
 

CD Reviews

Reminds one why rock went raga
Johann Cat | 04/09/2005
(4 out of 5 stars)

"If it is a cliché that Indian music blends spiritual uplift and a sweet, libidinous surge, not unlike some kinds of gospel, blues, and rocknroll, well, let it be, because this is a great example of Indian music as sexy and meditative at once. This is an instrumental, "orchestral" record with sitar and Indian string instruments prominent (no violin/ cello sections, mind you) that occasionally rocks, I kid you not.
The track called "Butterfly" is one of the best rocknroll numbers I have heard in the last year--it compares to something like "When the Levee Breaks" by Led Zeppelin in its drive and emotional scope, uniting a massive, repeated riff to great Indian drum work. This record not only makes one feel, unembarrassedly, like he's at a party at George Harrison's house in 1967, but it reminds one of just WHY rock become fascinated with Indian music: it can be full of scintillating layers of percussion, with urgent deep notes and emotive string work, absent guitars, that will rock your socks off. This is also very happy music without being maudlin; despite its very real instrumental sophistication, the whole experience is closer to a free garage band than to a paid evening with the Boston Symphony. And lest I misrepresent this, it is also quiet and soothing enough in many places for tea and conversation, too."