Search - Greenslade :: Time & Tide

Time & Tide
Greenslade
Time & Tide
Genres: Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

CD reissue of the Prog Rockers' 1975 album, their fourth overall. Greenslade was the brainchild of Dave Greenslade and Tony Reeves. 10 tracks. Wounded Bird.

      
1

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Greenslade
Title: Time & Tide
Members Wishing: 6
Total Copies: 0
Label: Wounded Bird Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/1975
Re-Release Date: 7/7/2009
Genres: Pop, Rock
Styles: Progressive, Progressive Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 664140868229

Synopsis

Album Description
CD reissue of the Prog Rockers' 1975 album, their fourth overall. Greenslade was the brainchild of Dave Greenslade and Tony Reeves. 10 tracks. Wounded Bird.

Similar CDs

 

CD Reviews

La-la-la
Gary | 02/21/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"There, there, Mr Lawson. Don't let the bullies grind you down. If your vocals are an acquired taste then I have long since acquired it. I may not understand much of what you're singing about but I defend to the death your right to sing about it incomprehensibly. Well, fisticuffs at dawn at least, if not pistols.

I always liked this album. The songs are just the right length, exhubarent in delivery and very musical, whatever that means. 'Doldrums' is one of the most beautiful songs ever written and I recommend Time and Tide for that alone."
Has Its Moments
P. McKenna | Atlanta GA | 09/30/2004
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Greenslade was a band that had tons of potential, but never got really close to what they were capable of. One of the reasons was Dave Lawson, not so much his instrumetnal skills, but rather his obnoxiously AWFUL vocals (he sounded like an angry Bobcat on its last legs). If they had just shut up and played they would've gotten a lot further in the prog realm.

The best tracks here are the instrumentals with lots of intricate counterpoint, colorful textures and cool changes of meter and tempo. Keyboardist/leader Dave Greenslade is a serious talent who never got the recognition he deserved. His cohorts were no less capable (love Andrew McCollough's drumming especially).

To boot, this disc was an attempt to get a more streamlined/saleable sound, however, it was for naught."