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All The Seasons Of George Winston: Piano Solos
George Winston
All The Seasons Of George Winston: Piano Solos
Genres: Jazz, New Age, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (17) - Disc #1

This CD is a sort of Reader's Digest version of George Winston's renowned solo piano discography. All the Seasons presents 13 abridged selections from Winston's seven solo recordings-- "radio edits" that were supervised, a...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: George Winston
Title: All The Seasons Of George Winston: Piano Solos
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 4
Label: Windham Hill Records
Original Release Date: 3/24/1998
Release Date: 3/24/1998
Genres: Jazz, New Age, Pop
Styles: Meditation, Adult Contemporary
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 019341126621

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This CD is a sort of Reader's Digest version of George Winston's renowned solo piano discography. All the Seasons presents 13 abridged selections from Winston's seven solo recordings-- "radio edits" that were supervised, as the liner notes indicate, by the pianist himself. Four "bonus tracks" are also included, and two are quiet, impressionistic gems that compare favorably with Winston's classic Autumn to December period. "Sandman" is an instrumental version of a section from the Meryl Streep-narrated storybook album The Velveteen Rabbit, and "Northern Plains" is a hushed, contemplative jewel, though its abrupt conclusion is a bit odd. Perhaps this, too, is an advanced edit of a piece that will someday be more fully realized. Ultimately, this album is best-suited for listeners unacquainted with Winston's work, since fans are likely to be dismayed when favorites such as "Colors/Dance" and "Joy" travel to unexpected places. For Winston neophytes though, the album offers a decent overview of his first 25 years of recording. --Terry Wood

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Member CD Reviews

Patricia K. from LOS ALAMOS, NM
Reviewed on 9/26/2006...
Very relaxing

CD Reviews

Terrific for a sampler
Neal C. Reynolds | Indianapolis, Indiana | 09/06/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"These are well edited radio cuts of George Winston's work. For pure solo piano that isn't drowned out by orchestra or diluted by vocals and other musicians, I don't think George Winston can be beat. However, this album is for new listeners more than long time followers. True, there are four added cuts, one a new and live version of "The Cradle". However, many are shortened and therefore disappointing to his core audience. Again, if you're new to George Winston's music, this is a great starting point."
From Solo Piano Publications
Kathy Parsons | Florence, OR United States | 11/08/2001
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This compilation is a celebration of pianist George Winston's 25 years of recording. The selections from Winston's seven albums are good, but nearly all of the pieces have been edited - some by a few seconds, some by more than half. Winston shortened his pieces to make singles for radio air-play over the years, but it seems that these edited selections might also have been calculated to appeal to a more mainstream, pop-oriented audience. Gone are Winston's improvisations, which were the most frequent in his earlier albums and a Winston trademark. "Colors/Dance" is one of Winston's best-known pieces (and one of my favorites); it was originally 10:25 - this version is down to 3:14. "Longing/Love" was another landmark piece for Winston, and almost half of it is edited out. Why? If not for commercial reasons, why were some of Winston's best pieces chopped, but "Variations on the Canon by Pachelbel" included? Isn't everyone tired of that piece by now? I also question the inclusion of Bach's "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" at the expense of Winston's more original work. In concert, Winston alternates his better-known work with jazz and blues, so the inclusion of "Treat Street" and "Miles City Train" shows that aspect of his playing - important in a retrospective. There are also four "bonus tracks": "The Cradle" is a lovely ballad, expanded from "Forest"; "Sandman" from "The Velveteen Rabbit" is presented for the first time without Meryl Streeps' narration - a lovely lullaby; "Northern Plains" was inspired and influenced by fellow pianist/Montanan, Philip Aaberg - wide open spaces that both composers describe so well; and "Sleep Baby Mine", another tender lullaby. This is a really "nice", easy-to-listen-to album, but I question it as a true representation of George Winston's work over the past 25 years. Too much is missing."