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Hub - Tones
Freddie Hubbard
Hub - Tones
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
Already the most formidable new trumpeter in jazz in 1962, Freddie Hubbard came into his own as a composer with this album with great originals that range from the complex, ferocious swinger "Hub-Tones" to his poignant "La...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Freddie Hubbard
Title: Hub - Tones
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: EMI Japan
Release Date: 10/22/2008
Album Type: Import
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
Already the most formidable new trumpeter in jazz in 1962, Freddie Hubbard came into his own as a composer with this album with great originals that range from the complex, ferocious swinger "Hub-Tones" to his poignant "Lament For Booker," written for the late Booker Little. James Spaulding, Herbie Hancock, Reggie Workman and Clifford Jarvis are all at their peak, bringing the brilliant music to life with artistry and feeling. Three alternate takes have been added to the original album.

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CD Reviews

Terrific Hub-Tones
Michael B. Richman | Portland, Maine USA | 02/18/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"In 1962, Freddie Hubbard was a full time member of Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, but he still had enough time to record three solo albums -- "The Artistry of Freddie Hubbard" for the Impulse label, and "Here To Stay" and "Hub-Tones" for Blue Note. While the former two derive a lot of their sound from that unmistakable Messenger style, "Hub-Tones" draws it feel from two of Hubbard's collaborations from a few years earlier -- "Free Jazz" and "Ole Coltrane." On "Hub-Tones," Hubbard utilizes the paths of freedom forged by Ornette and 'Trane, but stays grounded to the classic Blue Note sound. Joining Freddie on this October '62 session are James Spaulding (who unfortunately was never given the chance to record his own album for Blue Note, but was an important contributor to Grant Green's "Solid," Bobby Hutcherson's "Components" and Wayne Shorter's "Schizophrenia" among others) on alto sax and flute, Herbie Hancock on piano, Reggie Workman on bass and Clifford Jarvis on drums. Hubbard made many great albums for Blue Note, and "Hub-Tones" is as good as any of them."
Enjoyable romp by Mr. Hubbard.
Andy Williamson | Chicago, IL | 09/16/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"If you are a jazz fan this is one of those 'must have' albums that populates so many 'greatest albums' lists. Hub Tones is very enjoyable and very typical of Blue Note's esteemed 1950's and 60's output. "Prophet Jennings" and "Lament For Booker" are great tunes. Freddie sounds very warm and embracing in the latter especially. The back-up group here is solid as well, giving Freddie a solid foundation upon which to explore.While this album is quite good, I can't quite place it at the highest level of Blue Note recordings. I've listened to it quite a bit since I purchased it and there seems to be something lacking. Don't ask me what that is, I'm not sure, but I can feel it. I still recommend this disc, I just can't lump it in with the best of the best."
An Interesting Line-Up and a Fine Bop Recording
Andrew Stevenson | Union Springs, New York | 08/18/2004
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Any album recorded by the Freddie Hubbard quintet with alto saxophonist/flautist James Spaulding is worth owning and not only for the guarantee of fine muscianship. A jazz front line of trumpet and alto sax, not to mention trumpet and flute, is not nearly as common as trumpet and tenor sax (the brothers Adderley, Cannonball & Nat also spring to mind.) Add the brilliant pianist Herbie Hancock and the solid rhythm section of Reggie Workman and Clifford Jarvis and you can't go wrong here. All of the cuts are worth listening to again and again. Particularly beautiful is the sound of Hubbard's trumpet with Spaulding's flute. Trumpet and flute should be heard together more often in jazz! Remastered as part of the Rudy Van Gelder collection this CD features three alternate takes."