Search - Fight :: Small Deadly Space

Small Deadly Space
Fight
Small Deadly Space
Genres: Pop, Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

A Small Deadly Space sounds less like Pantera than did Fight's first release, War of Words, and more like vocalist Rob Halford's former band, Judas Priest. There are still plenty of superheavy Pantera-like riffs, but havin...  more »

      
2

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Fight
Title: Small Deadly Space
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony
Original Release Date: 4/18/1995
Release Date: 4/18/1995
Genres: Pop, Rock, Metal
Style:
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 074646664926

Synopsis

Amazon.com
A Small Deadly Space sounds less like Pantera than did Fight's first release, War of Words, and more like vocalist Rob Halford's former band, Judas Priest. There are still plenty of superheavy Pantera-like riffs, but having more input from the entire band (the first album was written almost entirely by Halford) has given this album more dynamic range and a larger variety of sounds. There's even a semi-ballad, "In a World of My Own Making," that brings to mind classic Priest. --Adem Tepedelen

Similar CDs


Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

Best Fight album... period!!!
L. Tucker | NY | 11/20/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album clearly shows an improved Fight with more input from the band (with some personnel changes from the first album as well).

Better songs, better performance..... nuff said!

The first album, while very good, shows Halford trying to fit into the current speed metal scene (early 90's). Good songs, but trying too hard to fit in.

This Fight album (A Small Deadly Space) shows Rob Halford being Rob Halford (closer to what we saw in Judas Priest).

There's a reason why Judas Priest (and Rob Halford) stand out in this genre. Quality! Most of the other bands in this genre, I do not care for. They're all flash & balls and no substance.

Rob Halford (Judas Priest, Fight, Halford) is all substance. The true Metal God.

A similar annolgy can be drawn with Ozzy Osborne. Most of the bands on the Ozzfest lineups (with the exception of the superb Iron Maiden) I can't even stomach to listen to, but Ozzy (whether solo or with Black Sabbath) stands head and shoulders above the rest with tons of substance and quality.

Rob Halford and Ozzy Osborne are two of a kind in a land of posers and wanna bees..."
Innovative Technical Exploration
Yoko Miyamoto | Chicago, IL | 12/11/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"While "War of Wars" is about the exploration of Rob Halford's voice, "Small Deadly Place" is more about the exploration of instrumental side of music. So, even though I bought it for Rob Halford's voice, I found myself muttering, "My, aren't they good!" on the drumming and guitar riffs many times over. And I am not even into guitar riffs.
The title song "Small Deadly Place" is awesome. "I am Alive" is also great. "Human Crane" is innovative and "In the World of My Own Making" is even more so in punctuating and accentuating the emotive piano-accompanied vocal with the assault of heavy riff. I was surprised first time I heard it but it is quite effective.
Good, solid, innovative album, overall.

"
I Owe Rob Halford An Apology
Kevin R. Lovelace | Saint Petersburg, FL USA | 06/01/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"When I bought this CD back in 1995, I wasn't overly impressed and didn't give it much of a chance. Now, 14 years later, and years removed from any lingering hang-ups about Judas Priest, I just happened to give the album (which now resides on an external hard drive) a spin while I was working on cleaning up some images on my computer. I was astonished by how much I like this album. No, it's probably not the most imaginative album I've ever heard, but every song works on its own (unless you demand nothing short of a revelatory experience - in which case I'd say go to church, ya demanding heifer). All I know is that this album kept my feet tapping and my head bobbing - something I didn't give it a chance to do in 1995.

When I think about what Heavy Metal has become since, this album was probably prophetic. I can't tell you how many modern bands sound to me like copycats of Fight nowadays to my ancient ears. Whether that's due to the natural evolution of the genre or something more significant, I couldn't say. It just seems to me that when I hear a lot of what's going on in Metal these days, I'll now be thinking "Halford did that 14 years ago".

In short, I owe Rob Halford an apology. When I first heard "A Small Deadly Space", I dismissed it. Unlike some of the folks here, "The War of Words" is the reason I never gave "A Small Deadly Space" much of a chance. In spite of a couple of terrific songs ("Into The Pit" and "Nailed To The Gun"), this album's predecessor was mostly a load of noise desperately hoping it was relevant. I didn't like it for the same reason that I didn't like Judas Priest's "Ram It Down" or "Painkiller". Now, many years removed and possessing a fresh perspective, I'll have to say that "A Small Deadly Space" holds up very well. If you're anything other than a hormonal teen-aged boy who mistakes speed with energy, you'll enjoy this CD. This album is for people who'd rather have a little weight to their Metal - a steak as opposed to an energy drink. If nothing else, like me you owe it Halford to give the man his due. This album kicks the crap out of much of what followed it."