Search - Don Cherry, Steve Lacy :: Evidence

Evidence
Don Cherry, Steve Lacy
Evidence
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

This curiosity features two of the most underappreciated jazz thinkers of the modern era--soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy and trumpeter Don Cherry (Carl Brown on bass and Billy Higgins on drums round out the quartet). Thoug...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Don Cherry, Steve Lacy
Title: Evidence
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Ojc
Release Date: 7/1/1991
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Traditional Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 025218175524, 025218175517

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This curiosity features two of the most underappreciated jazz thinkers of the modern era--soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy and trumpeter Don Cherry (Carl Brown on bass and Billy Higgins on drums round out the quartet). Though both men are known for their more exploratory moments, Evidence, recorded in 1960, is a decidedly restrained affair. With the exception of Duke Ellington's "The Mystery Song" and Billy Strayhorn's "Something to Live For", the program here is composed entirely of Thelonious Monk material. While Lacy's work with Monk is well known, adding Cherry's judiciously round tone painting as counterpoint to Lacy's stabbing melodies gives this disc a finished quality that fans of either horn player will appreciate. Monk fanatics, of course, will devour this. --S. Duda

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CD Reviews

Best Monk album that Monk never played on....
Matthew Watters | Vietnam | 12/15/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"All the talk of this record being "laid back" is off-base, as this is one of the best Thelonious Monk albums ever recorded ... without Monk's participation. Lacy had recorded a full album of Monk tunes before ('Reflections'), but that one had a piano: the inestimable Mal Waldron was a superb solo voice, but it was Lacy who was really capturing all the rhythmic and harmonic elements of Monk's material. So, it was only logical to do away with the piano for this record, and Don Cherry proves a superb fellow traveler. Sure, Cherry's playing on 'Evidence' is less "out there" than his work in the Ornette Coleman Quartet, but Cherry was a superbly underrated musician -- and this somewhat more controlled and cerebral performance proves just how good Cherry was. Like Lacy, Cherry had a tremendous feel for Monk's material, and he went on to take the idea of piano-less Monk covers into his work with the New York Contemporary Five. But 'Evidence' remains one of my favourite albums of all time, swinging, exciting and cerebral, and it doesn't deserve to be damned with faint praise. A high-water mark for everyone involved and highly recommended."