Search - Erik Truffaz :: Revisite

Revisite
Erik Truffaz
Revisite
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

Those who caught French trumpeter Erik Truffaz's 2000 release, The Mask--a forward-looking mélange of Miles Davis-influenced cool jazz and acoustic drum & bass grooves--will no doubt want to hear Truffaz's latest concoctio...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Erik Truffaz
Title: Revisite
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Release Date: 5/22/2001
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Jazz Fusion
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 724353261221

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Those who caught French trumpeter Erik Truffaz's 2000 release, The Mask--a forward-looking mélange of Miles Davis-influenced cool jazz and acoustic drum & bass grooves--will no doubt want to hear Truffaz's latest concoction, Revisité. Like The Mask, Revisité is culled from several albums Truffaz and his quartet released in France in the early '90s: Out of a Dream, The Dawn, and Bending New Corners. But unlike The Mask, which was a compilation of tunes from those albums, Revisité contains seven new remixes that push the original tracks into some impressively varied and innovative terrain. Using mostly the original acoustic performances and blanketing them in a wall of electronic sound, the remixes interestingly play up the electronic aspect of Truffaz's tunes without sacrificing the acoustic balance and interplay of the originals. Alex Gopher's "Bending New Corners" is straight-up drum & bass, while Goo's remix of "Siegfried" sounds like early '90's acid jazz, and Mobile in Motion's trip-hop flavored "The Dawn (Part 2)" would have sounded at home on the first Portishead album. Pierre Henry's take on "More," on the other hand, looks even further back, to Miles Davis's "Great Expectations" from the 1974 album Get Up with It in its extended, spacey melody and use of ambient electronic sounds. It's a testament to Truffaz's original material though, that even when the remixes sound a bit dated, they still put a fresh spin on what was already some very visionary music. --Ezra Gale

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CD Reviews

...whutha'ellis this?!?!?!?...
R. Davis | louisville, ky | 10/18/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"...the first time i listened to this i thought it was a joke!
i sampled thru this so fast and dismissed it so quickly, that if not for that police car behind mine on the highway, this would've hit the asphalt with a quickness!
surely somebody at blue-note was carrying a grudge against his superiors when he recommended putting this out to be consumed by the money-spending public! blue-note? and electro-down-tempo-chilled-out-neo-garbage! - never!but then i sat back and listened to it...i dont know how to categorize this for real, it really defies what i know to be jazz, electronica, acid and downtempo...hell, one song even has some freestyle hip-hop verses!
it is so odd! but i like it! the best references i can relate this to are tosca's suzuki mixed with maybe some sun ra/pharoah sanders type of thing!
i love this! i cant think of any event in which this might get played, other than just me sittin down to relax and gather my thoughts to...but that's somethin i do alot of!"
Ambient Future of Jazz
TUCO H. | Los Angeles, CA | 06/06/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is another EXTREMELY COOL album I first heard on KCRW's Chocolate City. It's basically an 'ambient-acid-jazz-house' record that has super-pristine virtuoso trumpet playing on it, courtesy of Erik Truffaz who sounds like a mixture of Miles Davis and Freddie Hubbard. He's heard soloing over the fancy, re-mixed, layered, transparent ambient landscapes, sounds that are deep and spacy and partly electronic but 100% ORGANIC in texture; they don't sound cheesy and fake, they stay in your head and twist your consciousness around gently, they don't drop out into some spare post-'70s zone like most done-to-death cliched jazz recordings. Jazz has has always short-changed sound, aural texture and production in favor of instrumental and interpretational prowess. There are very few brilliantly 'produced' jazz records in the sense that "Boston," "Pink Floyd," or "The ORb" are well-produced. Here, the great sound of a superior 'HOUSE' record merges with soulful soloing that looks forward to the future of jazz as a popular force. I think the future of jazz is toward a new fusion with the more 'ambient electronic' soundscapes pioneered by the 'acid jazz' experminters in the '90s. While having to sample most of their stuff, those guys showed where the hip direction is. Ever restless guitar genius John McLaughlin stated this many years ago and has experimented in that direction in his last two "Heart of Things" records. Truffaz and his re-mixers are already there on "Revisite" although in not quite as progressive or difficult a way as Mclaughlin was attempting. Also, anyone who likes this disc should also check out "Pariah's Pariah" by Gary Thomas."
Excellent
Rodrigo Guaiquil | Santiago, Chile | 01/31/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Drum'n'bass and Miles Davis in the same room. I usually listen electronic music and bits of jazz and this CD is a perfect amalgamation of rock, cool jazz and electronica. It has become one of may favourite soundtracks while I drive through the city where I live. It's a modern, eclectic, nostalgic and inspiring album."