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Dvorak: Symphony No. 8; The Noonday Witch
Antonin Dvorak, Claudio Abbado, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Dvorak: Symphony No. 8; The Noonday Witch
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1


      
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CD Details

All Artists: Antonin Dvorak, Claudio Abbado, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Title: Dvorak: Symphony No. 8; The Noonday Witch
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony
Release Date: 11/22/1994
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Theatrical, Incidental & Program Music, Symphonies
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 074646430323
 

CD Reviews

Very nicely done...!
Santa Fe Listener | 06/08/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The lyric approach to Dvorak 8th from Abbado is the main thesis of this performance. where other conductors miss the mark is where Abbado succeeds. Phrasing and balances are incredibly well done with very posished string playing throughout. A must for a serius Dvorak fan!"
A good performance with superlative playing, , but the stan
Santa Fe Listener | Santa Fe, NM USA | 02/17/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Being the greatest of Czech composers, and a lovable melodist, Dvorak has won any number of great eprformances for his last three symphonies. Abbado is up against Kubelik, Kertesz, Szell, Bruno Walter, Giulini, and Harnoncourt, just to mention outstanding conductors whose versions I have loved over the years. So it's really a matter of personal taste. The most Czech versions come from native-born conductors like Kubelik, Talich, and Ancerl. What Abbado has going for him, pure and simple, is the ravishing playing of the Berlin Phil. None of the versions mentioned above has quite the limpid clarity and effortless virtuosity of the Berliners.

But don't expect the earthy smell of Czech soil. This is an 'international' (i.e., faceless) performing style devoted to beautiful expression. Abbado himself is lyrical and sensitive (to a fault, perhaps) in keeping with that style. But he's not fussy, and he provides just enough starch to keep everything moving vigorously. His great predecessor, Karajan, missed Dvorak's style entirely in a reading for EMI that's almost grating despite the splendor of the playing. One is grateful for the lilting, melodic filler, The Noon Witch, a late, melliflous tone poem that turns mysterious halfway through, but at 13 min. it doesn't make for a generous CD in toto.

In all, I'd be tempted to demote Abbado's effort to 3 stars if it weren't for the dazzling playing."