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Jazz Party
Duke Ellington
Jazz Party
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1

Beginning as a cozy studio date where Duke Ellington was to merely commit a couple of recent compositions to tape, this session exploded into an uptempo Ellington appreciation party. The Duke's band was just returning from...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Duke Ellington
Title: Jazz Party
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sony
Release Date: 10/25/1990
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Swing Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 074644071221

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Beginning as a cozy studio date where Duke Ellington was to merely commit a couple of recent compositions to tape, this session exploded into an uptempo Ellington appreciation party. The Duke's band was just returning from a Florida stint, and the ensuing, impromptu "Welcome Home" bash broke out at Columbia's studios in New York. Jimmy Rushing stopped in, as did Dizzy Gillespie and a couple dozen other admirers. Musically, the Ellington unit is in prime form, taking up the recent percussion-heavy "Malletoba Spank" and "Tymperturbably Blue" with polyrhythmic gusto and ripping through "Ready, Go!" in tight, swaggering form. Dizzy's trumpet chimes in on "U.M.M.G." and "Hello Little Girl," playing muted solos that fit like a hand in the band's welcoming glove. This recording has the earmarks of a party, per its title, and the shindig was hopping. --Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

What a party!
Nikica Gilic | Zagreb, Croatia | 12/13/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Other reviewers have said it already, so I'll try to be breef. This is a great CD; ideal present for those who like diversity and innovativeness in jazz.

First of all, Ellington's "Toot Suite" can be interpreted as some sort of synthesis of the greatest part of history (and pre-history) of jazz, with ancient call and response model, Quentin Jackson's hyper expressive plunger trombone, a whole lot of swingin' going on and the fiercfull drive of Paul Gonsalves' bop-based tenor sax (other contributors - Russelll Procope, Britt Woodman, Shorty Rogers, etc.)...
Then there's the intriguing collaboration with New York's finest classical music percussionists ("Malletoba Spunk" and "Tymperturbably blue"), the classical ellingtonian interpretation of "All of me" starring Johnny Hodges, the essence of ellegant and sophisticated swing...

But, there are two recordings of this party that would elevate even the lousiest album into 5 stars category:

The first such recording is "U.M.M.G." in which great Dizzy Gillespie (a big band fan himself) works extremely well with the orchestra as a featured solloist (with short but more than elloquent solos and responses by Carney, Hamilton and other Ellingtonians). Dizzy plays both muted and open trumpet and, well, shines like a diamond in this inspiring company, under Duke's wise orchestral guidance.

The second recording is, as you may have already heard, a blues "Hello Little Girl" that puts together the "Basieish" base of the blues in the form of Jimmy Rushing's powerful voice, the "third streamish" verbosity of mister Jimmy Jones (taking Ellington's chair) and, of course, Gillespie's fanciful and yet again introspective blues flight on trumpet.... The ballance on this recording is far from perfect, but it doesn't bother me - it gives the feeling of live performance, improvisation, creative chaos that jazz is all about...

I actually own the LP, not the CD of this album, but I had listened the CD and I see no reason for you to miss it...."