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Dr John & His New Orleans Congregation
Dr John
Dr John & His New Orleans Congregation
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop, R&B, Rock, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Dr. John & his New Orleans Congregation is a straight re-issue of a 1973 compilation issued by Ace Records which brings together the best and most representative of Mac Rebennack's early recordings from the late 50's an...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Dr John
Title: Dr John & His New Orleans Congregation
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Diablo Records UK
Release Date: 11/23/1999
Album Type: Import
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop, R&B, Rock, Classic Rock
Styles: Piano Blues, Blues Rock, Psychedelic Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 740155881528

Synopsis

Album Description
Dr. John & his New Orleans Congregation is a straight re-issue of a 1973 compilation issued by Ace Records which brings together the best and most representative of Mac Rebennack's early recordings from the late 50's and early 60's. Featured performers include Earl King, Alvin Tyler, Frankie Ford and Lee Dorsey.

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CD Reviews

New Orleans weirdness (or is that redundant?)
Dr. Memory | rural Illinois | 07/24/2005
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Let's all kneel at the altar with the congregation and give thanks for these nuggets of R&B. Now rise and turn to #7 in your hymnal, "Down the Road". Having sung that, a few words. This hymnal isn't all gems. But there's enough to make it worth an R&B fan's while. The production throughout is often reminscent of U.S. Bonds' compressed-sound records, which is a good thing. And some songs stand out. "Storm Warning" is a fast instrumental with Dr. John's doomy, muscular, heavily reverb'd guitar and a honkin' bari sax break. "Bad Neighborhood" is a stitch; tongue planted firmly in cheek, Ronnie Barron proclaims the neighborhood bad because "Junior fired a slingshot/Through the church window." "Down the Road" is a snare-drum-fired second-line shuffle that'll make you cry, it's so funky. Earl King's "Let the Good Times Roll" is likely the version that inspired Jimi to record it on "Electric Ladyland". "Chick-A Wa Wa" has marvelously stoopid lyrics and Bobby Marchan singing out the top of his head. "Rock" is a blast of funk from early Lee Dorsey and his creamy/gritty vocals. The rest, while not great, is never mediocre thanks to the solid bands the good Dr. assembled. Now, congregation, let's rise once more and sing: "We did the rock and roll till late that night/She said, 'Hey there daddy, turn out the lights.'/Well, I didn't know what was all about/So I backed right back and began to shout/Chick-a wa/Chick-a wa wa wa.""