Search - David Arnold :: Tomorrow Never Dies: Music From The Motion Picture

Tomorrow Never Dies: Music From The Motion Picture
David Arnold
Tomorrow Never Dies: Music From The Motion Picture
Genres: Pop, Soundtracks
 
  •  Track Listings (15) - Disc #1

Where the previous Bond installment, Goldeneye, profited from the gratifying if belated introduction of actor Pierce Brosnan as an 007 for the '90s and beyond, it suffered from a musical mismatch. Composer Eric Serra had s...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: David Arnold
Title: Tomorrow Never Dies: Music From The Motion Picture
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 4
Label: A&M
Original Release Date: 11/25/1997
Release Date: 11/25/1997
Album Type: Soundtrack
Genres: Pop, Soundtracks
Style:
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731454083027, 731454083041

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Where the previous Bond installment, Goldeneye, profited from the gratifying if belated introduction of actor Pierce Brosnan as an 007 for the '90s and beyond, it suffered from a musical mismatch. Composer Eric Serra had scored several successes with French director Luc Besson (La Femme Nikita, The Professional, The Big Blue) but floundered trying to update a genre whose John Barry-penned scores had long ago become legend. David Arnold's music for Tomorrow Never Dies is arguably less adventuresome than Serra's for Goldeneye, returning largely to Barry's conservative musical pattern for the Bond films. But it's still grandly effective, and probably better than the movie it supports. --Jerry McCulley

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Member CD Reviews

Gordon H. from SAN DIEGO, CA
Reviewed on 3/21/2012...
My son loves soundtracks. I myself liked this one very much.

CD Reviews

Arnold brings it back to Bond
twekie | USA | 07/03/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"David Arnold is the man on this one. After the GoldenEye score came out, many were wondering what happened to the classic Bond styling. Well, it's back, with a twistSheryl Crow's theme is definately different for a Bond theme (not necessarily bad), but it actually makes no appearance in the score itself. The song "Surrender" by k.d. Lang acts as the theme for the score in numerous occasions, which is fitting becasue the song itself is much like one of Shirley Bassey's themes. One thing that Arnold did especially well is to bring back the Bond theme. Remember hearing it in GoldenEye? No, you don't. It wasn't there at all, except for the trailor (whcih was by Parodi Fair, but that's another cd)
The twist is the added techno styling to good ol' Bond intruments. Arnold did a great job in keeping stuff up to date, and Moby added to it with the Bond remix at the end of the CD. Great, great stuff.This CD, however, only has half of the score. If you want the whole score (editor's cut, as it is referrred to), you need the one that just says soundtrack. It's more expensive, and lacks Sheryl Crow, k.d Lang, and Moby's Remix. But it has some key tracks, like the ones at the climax of the movie. If you really are a Bond music fan, buy both.
*Interestingly enough, there is still some music missing, like the music heard at the cocktail party for the Carver Media Group. But it's stil good."
Best Soundtrack In Series
Derek Austin Johnson | Austin, Texas USA | 07/16/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"John Barry has stated that he won't do another Bond soundtrack. After listening to Arnold's work for "Tomorrow Never Dies", I'm not so sure this is a bad thing. Arnold has a clear idea of what makes Bond work musically; from the opening bars of "White Knight" to the fade of k.d. lang's "Surrender", you know exactly what you're listening to. Moby's "James Bond Theme" is a brilliant techno-pop take on the much-loved guitar piece by Barry (or Monty Norman, depending on who you listen to) and much more effective than Eric Serra's fumbled attempts on "Goldeneye". Sheryl Crow's title song has received a lot of flack from fans and critics, but I don't think it's completely justified. Granted, Crow's range is limited, and there are times when I think the vocals could have been more dynamic, but the lyrics are strong (much stronger than "Goldeneye") and the use of strings is effective; it grows on you after a few l! ! istenings. lang's "Surrender", in contrast, is a powerhouse, full of the same brio and energy. It's reminescent of Shirley Bassey's "Goldfinger" but is not imitative of that classic.THIS IS WHAT A JAMES BOND SOUNDTRACK SHOULD SOUND LIKE!"