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New Thing on Jupiter
Danny Frankel
New Thing on Jupiter
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
 
He makes his living as a percussionist in Broadway pits, and such, but Frankel's muse is a much subtler one. The music is extremely minimal, and Frankel successfully captures the spirit vibe of much early seventies jazz, e...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Danny Frankel
Title: New Thing on Jupiter
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Win Records
Original Release Date: 2/18/1997
Re-Release Date: 4/4/1997
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock
Styles: Contemporary Folk, Singer-Songwriters
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 751937102328

Synopsis

Amazon.com
He makes his living as a percussionist in Broadway pits, and such, but Frankel's muse is a much subtler one. The music is extremely minimal, and Frankel successfully captures the spirit vibe of much early seventies jazz, even naming a song after Alice Coltrane. To be able to pull this off without postmodern posturing is nothing short of miraculous in the current musical climate, especially when featuring Mimi Goese and Petra Haden, among other guests. Frankel also plays little instruments such as wood flute, and manages to make tape loops sound acoustic. One of the overlooked gems of the decade. --D. Strauss
 

CD Reviews

Music you really need to hear
Jan P. Dennis | Monument, CO USA | 07/03/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Beatnik jazz minimalism. Without irony. And not in the least postmodern. How do they do THAT?

It's the crazy vision of Danny Frankel, who so brilliantly lent his percussive stylings to Stephen Bernstein's remarkable release, Diaspora Hollywood. Having assembled a diverse group of musicians (unknown to me, save for the inimitable Petra Haden, who's appearing on quite a few projects these days, not the least being her duo with Bill Frisell) including Gabe Cousins (whistling, trumpet), Joseph Hammer (tape loops, optigan[?], autoharp loop), Mimi (recorder, harmonium), Doug Wieselman (electric guitar, clarinet), and Nan Vernon (unplugged electric guitar), Frankel deploys a staggering array of percussion and little instruments, including bongo, congas, claypot, tambourine, cymbal, Casio keyboard, hand drum, ashtray, cowbell, wood flute, shaker, and finger cymbals).

This is music of rare beauty, not seeking to overwhelm, let alone blow anyone out of the water. Instead, it operates between the spaces occupied by most musics--with limited intentions and sonorities, with a kind of purposely pared down aesthetic, with an attention to detail and sonic (especially percussive) space seldom encountered in the age of the massive attack.

I must admit, it takes a rare mood for me to pull out this disc. I'm looking for a precise, rarely encountered aesthetic experience--fragile, ephemeral, small-scale, but entirely satisfying. And this disc seldom fails to deliver."