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Daniel Barenboim, Pinchas Zukerman & Jacqueline du Pré - Beethoven: Piano Trios
Ludwig van Beethoven, Jacqueline Du Pre, Pinchas Zukerman
Daniel Barenboim, Pinchas Zukerman & Jacqueline du Pré - Beethoven: Piano Trios
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #2
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #3


      
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CD Reviews

A Treasure!!!
Mark R. De Yoe | San Diego, California United States | 05/03/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"It would take a long, long time to write all that could be written about this historic CD. Here, you have three of the best musicians ever in their respective fields playing some of Beethoven's very best music. I now have a large classical music collection. This CD is one of the gemstones of my collection. I love it. Reference grade."
Enraptured and inspired recordings!
Hiram Gomez Pardo | Valencia, Venezuela | 09/07/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This set of Beethoven' s piano trios has overly been one of the most famed in the late sixties. The inspired and magnificent musical chemistry among these three soloists was of first-rate class. On one hand you should be aware the fabulous rapport between Mrs. Dupre and his husband Mr. Barenboim in the set of cello sonatas; on the other hand Pinchas Zukerman and Barenboim recorded too some Beethoven 's violin sonatas; so it's not easy to understand the positive vibes.

It should be underlined we are talking interpretative freshness, and that youthful breadth among this ensemble that hardly, adding all his ages, would be under the 100 years. If you are seeking for definitive versions, go for the set of Kempff, Szerying and Fournier, but this is a very wise option.
"
Beethoven Trios
Christopher Ray | Swarthmore, PA, USA | 09/01/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"These trios are exceptionally presented. Some are typical chamber music of the time, but that is Beethoven's choice, not the fault of the players. Other trios are sublime, such as the Arch Duke trio and the Allegreto in B flat and several others that have a strong melodic line. The piano, violin, and cello work closely together and are well balanced. I am especially struck by Berenbohm's piano technique (Esp at the last movement of the piano trio in G Op1, #2) and du Pre's soft cello building harmonies throughout the trios."