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Too Marvelous for Words
Count Basie
Too Marvelous for Words
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Riffing off their renown for hard-swinging big-band jazz, the members of Count Basie's classic orchestra crafted an ambling, laid-back groove in the 1950s, recording in a number of small-group settings for the Vanguard lab...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Count Basie
Title: Too Marvelous for Words
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Vanguard Records
Release Date: 5/25/1999
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop
Styles: Swing Jazz, Traditional Jazz & Ragtime
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 015707960120, 090204819928

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Riffing off their renown for hard-swinging big-band jazz, the members of Count Basie's classic orchestra crafted an ambling, laid-back groove in the 1950s, recording in a number of small-group settings for the Vanguard label. This collection grabs some astounding highlights, from the churning "Shoe Shine Boy" to a bevy of Ellington items, including "Caravan," "Perdido," and "Satin Doll." On several tracks the band's leader is drummer Jo Jones, aided by guitarist Freddie Green, bassist Walter Page, and a three-horn frontline of tenor Lucky Thompson, trombonist Benny Green, and trumpeter Emmett Berry. But Roy Eldridge and Vic Dickenson make brassy entries, too, on a pair of cuts, and singer Joe Williams belts out the blues on three songs taken from the much-celebrated 1956 Night at Count Basie's session. Rarely has a subset of a touring big band been able to set up and go on record with such grand results as these. --Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

Caravan with a drum sola
Matthew Watters | Vietnam | 11/15/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Count Basie drummer Jo Jones typically subsumed himself so successfully to the music, that he is sometimes overlooked in favour of more in-your-face drummers of his era and after like Gene Krupa or Buddy Rich. But this collection should erase any doubts that Jones truly was the greatest drummer of all time. For one thing, John Hammond records him in pristine sound, allowing one to hear for once all the nuance of his brush work and his subtle cross-rhythms and punctuations. He is the most astonishingly musical of drummers and here even gets the rare spotlight of a couple of extended solos, on "Caravan" and "Old Man River". It's the stuff from which legends can be made. The cuts are drawn from two albums from 1956-57 made for Vanguard Records: 'Jo Jones Special' which features a band of Basie veterans, plus the Count himself on an incendiary remake of "Shoeshine Boy"; and 'Jo Jones Plus Two', a rollicking and joyous trio outing with pianist Ray Bryant. That might be the only thing to fault this CD for. It just makes you want to go out immediately and get the full albums. Some remaining cuts are taken from a Buck Clayton album that also features Jones and some other former Basie band members, as well as some less spectacular cuts from a live album made at Count Basie's Bar. But, despite the slightly silly "Basie Bunch" moniker, Jo Jones remains the real headliner of this compilation."