Search - Mitropoulos, Schoenberg, Scriabin :: Conducts Schoenberg & Scriabin

Conducts Schoenberg & Scriabin
Mitropoulos, Schoenberg, Scriabin
Conducts Schoenberg & Scriabin
Genre: Classical
 
Thick, complex orchestra scores were food and drink to Dimitri Mitropoulos, who sails through these demanding works with authority and an insight bordering on clairvoyance. The conductor maintains a firm handle on Scriabin...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Mitropoulos, Schoenberg, Scriabin, Philharmonic
Title: Conducts Schoenberg & Scriabin
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Music & Arts Program
Original Release Date: 1/1/1953
Re-Release Date: 6/17/1997
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Theatrical, Incidental & Program Music, Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century, Symphonies
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 017685096723

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Thick, complex orchestra scores were food and drink to Dimitri Mitropoulos, who sails through these demanding works with authority and an insight bordering on clairvoyance. The conductor maintains a firm handle on Scriabin's elusive syntax as Hambro darts in and out of the orchestral thicket like a firefly on the lam. Where's the wordless chorus? As for the Schönberg, Mitropoulos delivers the most gripping, emotionally charged Pelleas on record. Mirtopolous wields a more flexible hand than Boulez or Karajan, and imparts greater profile and shape to the work as a whole, as the leitmotivs take on unprecedented urgency and character. Excellent mono broadcast sound makes these 1953 concert performances easy to recommend. --Jed Distler.
 

CD Reviews

A verismo Pelleas
R. J. Claster | Van Nuys, CA United States | 05/27/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is a totally different interpretation than Von Karajan's well-known DG recording. Whereas Karajan creates a silky, sumptuous, yet finely detailed sound that focuses one's attention on the piece as an orchestral tour de force, Mitropoulos concentrates instead on its dramatic flow and intensity as a musical narrative of a story of passion, jealousy and murder, an approach which imparts both a coherence and flexibility plus cumulative impact to this rather sprawling work that is lacking in Karajan's more static interpretation. The sound is wonderfully clear, dynamic and spacious, superior in these respects to most commercial recordings I have heard from the same time (early 1950s). An essential purchase for lovers of either this work, Schoenberg in general, or Germanic late romaticism."