Search - Charlie Patton :: Founder of Delta Blues

Founder of Delta Blues
Charlie Patton
Founder of Delta Blues
Genres: Country, Blues, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (26) - Disc #1

Although the title of founder might not be exactly accurate, Patton does cast a giant shadow over Mississippi blues. His background as a medicine show entertainer made him more than the typical brooding bluesman. Much of h...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Charlie Patton
Title: Founder of Delta Blues
Members Wishing: 9
Total Copies: 0
Label: Yazoo
Release Date: 3/21/1995
Genres: Country, Blues, Pop
Styles: Classic Country, Delta Blues, Traditional Blues, Acoustic Blues, Slide Guitar
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 016351201027

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Although the title of founder might not be exactly accurate, Patton does cast a giant shadow over Mississippi blues. His background as a medicine show entertainer made him more than the typical brooding bluesman. Much of his repertoire was upbeat and just plain fun. Take, for instance, his rendition of "Shake It and Break It": the gravelly voiced Patton snaps his strings and taps out the rhythm on his guitar while not missing a beat. His slide numbers like "High Sheriff" and "When Your Way Gets Dark" are beautiful melodic pieces seldom matched by his peers. He was also an early mentor of Robert Johnson, who probably picked up his trademark descending bass run from Patton. Charley was one of the true greats and is required listening for Delta blues fans. --Lars Gandil

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CD Reviews

Primal Delta Blues
Chris Luallen | Nashville, Tennessee | 09/20/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Before Robert Johnson there was an older generation of Delta blues musicians of which Charlie Patton was a part. Patton, with his rough voice and primitive sound, may take getting used to for some. But I find him to be among the most poweful of all the bluesmen. His music is rhythmically charged and his lyrics are funny, emotional and very smart. He cleverly takes on the role of a bo weavil addressing his wife in "Bo Weavil Blues" and the desperate voice of a drug addict in "A Spoonful Blues". But my favorite has to be "Down The Dirt Road Blues", where he travels with his woman to the "Indian Nation" in Oklahoma. Patton was apparently 1/4 Cherokee and hoped to obtain a place on the reservation. But instead he ends up alone and full of despair.

Every day seem like murder here
My God, I'm no sheriff
Every day seem like murder here
I'm gonna leave tomorrow, I know you don't bid my care

When it comes to the blues no one is more passionate and intense than Charlie Patton. This is definitely a must for anyone that loves soul filled blues music."