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Sacrilege - Remixes
Can
Sacrilege - Remixes
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #2

Without a doubt, Can were the best thing to come out of Germany (with the possible exception of Borussia Dortmund). Lodged somewhere outside the sacred and profane, their music was never less than challenging, quite often ...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Can
Title: Sacrilege - Remixes
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 1
Label: Mute U.S.
Original Release Date: 5/20/1997
Release Date: 5/20/1997
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock
Styles: Electronica, Experimental Music, Dance Pop, Progressive, Progressive Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 724596903322, 4015887000391, 5016025381906, 5016025681907, 5016025681938, 724596903315, 5099923729759

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Without a doubt, Can were the best thing to come out of Germany (with the possible exception of Borussia Dortmund). Lodged somewhere outside the sacred and profane, their music was never less than challenging, quite often confounding and an influence on a generation of musicians who listened with its brains. Can, of course, are in the can now, but the malady lingers on, and in these 16 tracks it's exhumed, restructured and generally treated to all sorts of amazing necrophilia, to the point where you could call this something new. But better to call it brilliant. Even Sonic Yoof, not known for their taste, turn "Spoon" into something that's dripping with menace. The Orb perform the usual magic on "Halleluwah," while Pete Shelley's tinkering with "Father Cannot Yell" manages the odd feat of turning it into an '80s extended disco mix. And not one bit of it is bad. If getting in a bunch of grand remixers (add System 7, Kris Needs, Bruce Gilbert, and others to the list above) to perform surgery is the tribute album of the future, then I'm all in favor. --Chris Nickson

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CD Reviews

Can - 'Sacrilege: The Remixes' (Mute)
Mike Reed | USA | 08/05/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"So nice to finally catch this 2-CD title priced under the retail price of $18.95. Total of sixteen classic Can compositions that've been been given a complete make-over (in some cases) to give true casual Can fans and die-hards something else to listen to on a spare evening. Remix jobs that I, personally got the most out of were "Spoon" redone by Sonic Youth, "Vitamin C" by U.N.K.L.E., a good version of "Oh Yeah" by Sunroof, "Future Days" given the works from Blade Runner and "Dizzy Spoon" by Steve Hillage and System 7. 'Sacriledge' is obviously more in a industrial direction. Some might say this 2-CD is strictly for completists. Maybe so, but it's still good."
Interesting, but could've been a lot better
tobemilo | Sweden | 02/24/2002
(3 out of 5 stars)

"There seems to be two different opinons on this CD:The prog rock fans say that the music is too much like "boring modern electronic dance music", and the people into modern electronic music find the remixes "dated" and I admit that most of the remixes aren't exactly cutting edge.Personally I find some of the remixes interesting, but a lot of it is rather boring and nothing on this double CD can be called essential. My favourites are "Yoo doo right" (because it must be one of the hardest tracks in the Can discography to remix, but they really succeed and do a version that is as far away from the original that's possible), "Oh yeah (the Sunroof mix) and "Tango Whiskeyman". The last track mentioned has absolutely nothing to do with the Can song, by the way, although it has some bits and pieces from the track "Gomorrha" (found on "Unlimited Edition") in it.The fact that a lot of reviewers claim the Brian Eno remix of "Pnoom" as one of their favourites says quite a lot of the contents of this album. Actually, it's not a remix at all but just pieces of the track cut up and re-assembled in a different order. But I could listen to those funky drums in "Pnoom" all day long so I don't really mind...I enjoy hearing the classic basslines of Holger Czukay and the metronomic drums of Jaki Leibezeit in any context, so this album provides quite a lot of pleasant listening although it never reaches the heights of the original albums, such as "Tago Mago" or "Future Days"."