Search - Byther Smith :: Housefire

Housefire
Byther Smith
Housefire
Genre: Blues
 
During the 1970s Byther Smith became internationally recognized as an obscure but deserving cult figure among blues fans, based on live performances and only a handful of singles -- collectors' items dating back to the '60...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Byther Smith
Title: Housefire
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rounder Records
Release Date: 2/2/2009
Genre: Blues
Styles: Chicago Blues, Electric Blues, Modern Blues
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 011661950320, 011661950313, 011661950344, 011661950320

Synopsis

Album Description
During the 1970s Byther Smith became internationally recognized as an obscure but deserving cult figure among blues fans, based on live performances and only a handful of singles -- collectors' items dating back to the '60s. This album, recorded in 1984 with a band featuring the great pianist Lafayette Leake, includes nine searing performances of Smith originals, including "Live on and Sing the Blues," and "The Man Wants Me Dead." His punchy, economical guitar statements and extraordinarily emotional singing place him securely among the legends whose music he has woven into his own powerful, vital stylings. A moving survey of modern Chicago blues.
 

CD Reviews

Very Good
Sam Mosley | Toronto, Ontario | 11/25/2004
(4 out of 5 stars)

"'Housefire' was originally released in 1985 but went fairly unnoticed and quickly went out of print, until Bullseye Records re-released it onto CD, and we can thank then for that. It is a fine showcase for Byther Smith's talent, and while it may not be as solid as some of his other albums, it is very fine none-the-less. All but one song is an original, a stinging cover of Detroit Junior's "Money Tree" which opens the CD. The rest are all Smiity's own, and showcase his very intense style. With song titles like "The Man Want's me Dead", you know he means business. Even the instrumental "Knockdown" has a powerful driving force to it that grab's your attention quickly. "Live on and Sing the Blues" is one of the most powerful slow blues I have heard in a while and you believe Smitty that he has lived the blues life when you hear him.
"Housefire" may not be as good as the recently re-released 'Hold That Train', but it is still a fine album of blues that any fan of Byther Smith's must have."