Search - Buddy Rich :: Mercy Mercy - Live at Caesars Palace 1968 (Reis)

Mercy Mercy - Live at Caesars Palace 1968 (Reis)
Buddy Rich
Mercy Mercy - Live at Caesars Palace 1968 (Reis)
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

Buddy Rich was pumping new life into the big-band genre and enjoying a tremendous resurgence in popularity when he recorded this powerhouse group at Caesars Palace in 1968. It's a winning combination of enthusiastic young ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Buddy Rich
Title: Mercy Mercy - Live at Caesars Palace 1968 (Reis)
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/1968
Re-Release Date: 3/25/1997
Album Type: Live
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Swing Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 724385433122, 724385433153, 072438543312

Synopsis

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Buddy Rich was pumping new life into the big-band genre and enjoying a tremendous resurgence in popularity when he recorded this powerhouse group at Caesars Palace in 1968. It's a winning combination of enthusiastic young musicians, a few current pop tunes, exceptional veteran arrangers and soloists, and Rich himself, pressing the band to its limits with his volatile drumming. While it's the band itself that occupies center stage, there are also terrific individual efforts. Guitarist Walt Namuth emphasizes the funky dimension of "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" and "Ode to Billie Joe," while the veteran altoist Art Pepper brings soulful lyricism to the rich hues of "Alfie" and "Chelsea Bridge." Trumpeter Bill Pierce and tenorist Don Menza add several hard-swinging solos to the mix, pushed on by the powerful horn sections. From Bill Reddie's ambitious "Channel 1 Suite" to Henry Mancini's popular "Mr. Lucky," this is a great balance of big-band excitement and precision. --Adam Rains

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CD Reviews

Classic
Bill Your 'Free Form FM Handi Cyber | Mahwah, NJ USA | 02/22/2010
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Say what you want about Buddy Rich--and you could say a hell of a lot. He ignored the avant-gaurd in jazz. He was commerical. He sure as hell had ions to go in the personality department. I had a bass teacher who played me a backstage tape once of Rich yelling at his band backstage--and if were that or being at the end of a napalm attack, I'd wave in the airplanes.

But as a player and arranger and leader you cannot deny massive abilty. No more evidence is needed than Mercy Mercy, a 1960s gig for Rich.

Even the pop songs display the endless talent of Rich's crack band and his amazing drive and technique as a drummer. Even the popular songs here have beefed up arrangements that are awe inducing. Rich could have made the worst elevator pop of the 1960s sound massive and important.

But he did the same or better with advanced compositions: listen to "Channel One Suite," a cinimatic extended piece that catches the big swing you hear in so much 60s program music--think action spy romances--but could work as a classical composition

This band could do anything, and do more than enough with Rich leading on this album"