Search - Tab Benoit, Billy Joe Shaver, Jim Lauderdale :: Brother to the Blues

Brother to the Blues
Tab Benoit, Billy Joe Shaver, Jim Lauderdale
Brother to the Blues
Genres: Blues, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Louisiana native Tab Benoit has been slinging his swamp-R&B-blues-rock concoction for the better part of 15 years, and from the sound of this disc's opening two tunes, it seems that little besides his backing band has chan...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Tab Benoit, Billy Joe Shaver, Jim Lauderdale, Louisiana's LeRoux
Title: Brother to the Blues
Members Wishing: 6
Total Copies: 0
Label: Telarc
Original Release Date: 1/1/2006
Re-Release Date: 4/25/2006
Genres: Blues, Pop
Styles: Regional Blues, New Orleans Blues
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 089408363924

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Louisiana native Tab Benoit has been slinging his swamp-R&B-blues-rock concoction for the better part of 15 years, and from the sound of this disc's opening two tunes, it seems that little besides his backing band has changed. But when the title track kicks in with sorrowful fiddle, crying pedal steel (also played by Benoit), and a lovely, lonely honky-tonk melody, it's clear the singer/guitarist has decided to visit some unique territory. Country stalwarts Jim Lauderdale and Billy Joe Shaver swing by to provide duet vocals for Benoit's versions of their songs. Even Hank Williams Sr.'s "I Heard That Lonesome Whistle" gets covered as Benoit finds the blues at the heart of the country standard. Those who are not county lovers need not be concerned that Benoit has gone all George Jones on them. He still grinds out slabs of tough bayou rocking in the crackling "So High" and the opening "Pack It Up." There's also a heartbreaking, loungey, slow blues ("Somehow") and a soul-seared cover of Sam Cooke's "Bring It on Home to Me" that shows how effective Benoit is as an interpretive vocalist. The funky Little Feat/Neville Brothers-styled "Can't Do One More Two-Step" truly brings it home on a diverse outing that stretches boundaries and adds depth to Benoit's already impressive roots. --Hal Horowitz

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CD Reviews

Warning: This is not a blues CD
Somebody | KCMO | 05/11/2006
(2 out of 5 stars)

"Don't let the title confuse you. This is not a blues CD. Its country. Tab Benoit writes in the liner notes this is a "special project" of all of his "early musical influences" "especially early country music."

It's well recorded. It has some nice music. It has fiddles, banjos and pedal steel guitars. But it isn't a "brother to the blues." It's only a distant cousin."
Interesting, if not misleading title!
deepbluereview | SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA USA | 06/01/2006
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Tab Benoit is one of my favorite blues artists and I particularly like it when he mixes the blues with a little Cajun flavor from the Bayou. That being said, I was taken by surprise at the lack of blues on this release. The CD consists of mostly hillside country music complete with pedal steel, banjo and fiddle. Something tells me that if he titled this recording to reveal its true contents, sales would be somewhat dismal. Tab's tip of the hat to the songs which he knew as a child will be better appreciated by some country fans but, it is sure to leave blues fans a little unsatisfied. Especially knowing that we may have to wait another year or two for a suitable new release."
Tab Reaches New Heights
Rayman | New England | 04/29/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Tab fans know that his blues is rooted in country and cajun. His signature Telecaster Thinline tone often sings like a fiddle. This collection of tunes taps his country side while bringing out at more disciplined, chops-oriented approach to some well-crafted songs. Backed superbly by Louisiana's LeRoux band, he delivers 13 great tracks. The production is first-rate, as is the song sequencing.

The first 3 tunes take you through 3 styles: Freddie King' "Pack It Up", Sam Cooke's "Bring it on Home To Me", and the title track, "Brother To the Blues." This one may rattle some Tab fans heads as a straight country ballad. But it's solid and sincere, and it works. (Bring It On Home is one chorus too long - especially as track 2 - but that's minor nit.)

Guessing that most Tab fans have seen his live shows, the Hank Williams' "I Heard That Lonesome Whistle Blow" will recall his between-set solo section, as will the original fingerpicked "Moon Coming over the Hill"

The highlight is the original "Somehow" - a slow blues burner that channels Ronnie Earl and some tasty chords over soulful vocals.

I have just about everything this guy has recorded and see him live as often as I can. He's the real deal, and this record makes it clear. This CD delivers!"