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That's It
Booker Ervin
That's It
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

Booker Ervin was a strongly individual player who always had a very unique sound on the tenor and was influenced by his association with Charles Mingus. Booker is heard in prime form on this quartet set from 1961 with pian...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Booker Ervin
Title: That's It
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Candid
Original Release Date: 1/1/1990
Re-Release Date: 10/5/2004
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 708857901425

Synopsis

Product Description
Booker Ervin was a strongly individual player who always had a very unique sound on the tenor and was influenced by his association with Charles Mingus. Booker is heard in prime form on this quartet set from 1961 with pianist Horace Parlan, bassist George Tucker and drummer Al Harewood. In virtually all cases, the jazz and blues musicians who recorded for Candid in 1960-61 (during its original brief existence) were inspired and played more creatively than they did for other labels. That fact is true for Ervin, even if he never made an indifferent record. In addition to Poinciana and Speak Low, Ervin's quartet (which was a regular if short-lived group) performs four of the leader's originals; best known is Booker's Blues.

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CD Reviews

Great Booker Ervin
L. Topper | 08/01/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I believe that this record was produced by Nat Hentoff. This is the record that sold me on Booker Ervin. It is really heavy and tough sounding. Ervin's style is unrelentingly tough and atmospheric. His style reminds me of Jackie McLean who I believe is also an unrelentingly swinging, tough stylist. If you like early 1960's Jackie McLean, you will like Booker Ervin.

My favorite song on it is "Poinciana." It really swings. The tenor sax is wonderful. The rhythm is slightly latin sounding--particularly the cymbal work. The bass is especially well miked. It feels like you are sitting right next to it when he does his walking bass lines. You can hear him slapping the strings. Horace Parlan is playing piano. He plays in a "chord like style." Apparantly he suffered from polio as a child and made some of his fingers less useful. He had to adapt his style like Carl Perkins.

The band's version of "Speak Low" does not receive a soft lilting treatment that you so often hear. Again, it is hard driving and bluesy sounding. It is just great. "Booker's Blues" is the slower blues number.

Lastly, the sound quality is really excellent. You can hear each and every instrument so clearly. You would swear that it was recorded just a few years ago instead of 1961. If you could only have one Booker Ervin disc (which I would not recommend because he is so great), this might be the single disc to own. Get it while it is still available!



"
He paid his dues...
reading man | 08/10/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"He played trombone at eight, taught himself tenor as a teen, and led a military band. After formal training he toured the States. And quit. He was a draftsman and worked for the post office. He came to New York to play, and washed dishes to survive. He joined Charles Mingus and found his voice.

He contributes four originals here. I like Booker's Blues.

Bass opens on a slow, tantalizing, single note walking line. Sax takes its time, slowly unwinding a deep, lyrical statement that highlights the set. An understated piano maintains mood. Bass takes a strong turn, expanding the theme while maintaining pace, before sax returns briefly and they close. The eleven-minute arrangement is outstanding.

Mr. Ervin and Mr. Parlan (piano) were with Charles Mingus for fifteen months. The pianist, George Tucker (bass), and Al Harewood (drums) had played and recorded together for over a year. The sound is tight. Familiarity breeds content, and results in a fine display of straight-ahead blowing by these artists."