Search - Bill Evans :: Complete Fantasy Recording

Complete Fantasy Recording
Bill Evans
Complete Fantasy Recording
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #2
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #3
  •  Track Listings (15) - Disc #4
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #5
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #6
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #7
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #8
  •  Track Listings (1) - Disc #9

Given the peerless depth of Bill Evans's work for Riverside in the early 1960s (collected in its entirety on The Complete Riverside Recordings) followed by some similarly stellar outings on Verve (collected on the mammoth ...  more »

      
1

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: Bill Evans
Title: Complete Fantasy Recording
Members Wishing: 6
Total Copies: 0
Label: Fantasy
Original Release Date: 6/6/1989
Re-Release Date: 7/1/1991
Album Type: Box set
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Cool Jazz, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Traditional Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 9
SwapaCD Credits: 9
UPC: 025218101226

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Given the peerless depth of Bill Evans's work for Riverside in the early 1960s (collected in its entirety on The Complete Riverside Recordings) followed by some similarly stellar outings on Verve (collected on the mammoth 18-CD Complete Bill Evans on Verve), it's understandable that the pianist's work from the 1970s might get short shrift. Understandable, but not justified, as this nine-CD set illustrates. Evans's years at Fantasy brought forth some monuments, including his first session of duets with Tony Bennett. His solo and trio work continues to develop over the course of these sessions, all of them corrected for chronology, ignoring earlier albums' track orders. His group playing also shows development, intensified refinement, and an acute collective sense that seems to grow and absorb whoever is on the gig. Tenor saxophonist Harold Land makes a fine showing, as does the underrated, dynamic duo of Lee Konitz and Warne Marsh. Sure, Evans makes the ill-considered stumble of trying to get a Fender Rhodes to reflect his sense of touch and phrasing, but he shows again and again why he is so magnificent a composer, improviser, and group-leading thinker. As he neared his death in 1980, his flow of ideas seems--at least in hindsight--irrepressible, and for that reason, fascinating. --Andrew Bartlett

Similar CDs

 

CD Reviews

Transitional Evans
twinky@start.com.au | Canberra, Australia | 06/19/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This set represents all of the recordings made for Fantasy Records from 1973 through until 1979. The recordings are primarily in trio format, with one solo set and two quintet sets. The Bill Evans/Tony Bennett Album is also included in full. Over this period of time Bill Evans was reportedly drug free and his playing repartiore is greatly enhanced. However, despite new material, Evans failed to grow much musically. The playing is these 9 discs is technically near-perfect with multiple highlights. The music is typically mellow and complex in the style of Evans, with the solo set really showing the depth of Bill Evans as an jazz pianist. Overall, these recordings are both interesting and enjoyable. The recording quality is consistantly good, even in the live situations. As a bonus, the ninth disc represents a 1979 interview with Marian McPartland. I found this interview to be very information and of great interest. These recordings represent Bill Evans in a transitional stage which eventually led to his more aggressive approach over his last year of performance. This set comes recommended to both Evans fanatics and general jazz listeners."
Emotionally Naked
Johnson Lee | Irvine, CA USA | 11/09/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"More emotionally naked than his recordings with other labels. Some of his work for Riverside sounds a bit too abstract, though brilliant, compared to this Fantasy set. Good examples are the surprising passion of Gloria's Steps or honest lyricism of But Beautiful. And you cannot miss the duet tracks with Eddie Gomez. The music is as overwhelming and heart-wrenching as the extremely personal liner notes."