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Love Songs & Trance Hymns
Baluchi Ensemble
Love Songs & Trance Hymns
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Folk, World Music, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1

The Baluch are a people without a geography, a culture that has connections to India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, and they are purported to have been influential in Iran in the 10th century. An argument could be made (and i...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Baluchi Ensemble
Title: Love Songs & Trance Hymns
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Shanachie
Original Release Date: 1/19/1999
Release Date: 1/19/1999
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Folk, World Music, Pop
Styles: World Dance, Traditional Folk, Middle East, Afghanistan, Iran, India & Pakistan, Pakistan
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 016351661623

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The Baluch are a people without a geography, a culture that has connections to India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, and they are purported to have been influential in Iran in the 10th century. An argument could be made (and is in the liner notes) for their predecessors being proto-Gypsies, although there is plenty to suggest otherwise. But the music bears traits similar to Middle Eastern Gypsy music, as well as the music of Rajasthan. The ensemble here consists of singers, sorud (fiddle), tamburag (lute), and a unique mechanical dulcimer called benju. The central instrument is the sarud, a fiddle made of wood and a goat skin for a sounding board. It has a bright, thin, open sound that dominates the tone of the music throughout. The songs recorded for this CD include wedding and social songs and lively festival numbers, some danceably rhythmic, others slightly trancelike. The playing is often vivid and passionate, but a few tracks sound like they were walked though in a haze. --Louis Gibson

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CD Reviews

Festive and spiritual
04/05/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The Baluch music is filled with beautiful rhythms capped by the mysteriously transfixing voice of female lead vocalist Rahima. Admittedly, since the Baluch Ensemble's music is an experience involving the whole body (there is an important visual element to this music), the CD cannot prefectly replicate a live concert. Nonetheless, I'd highly recommend it to both music experts and casual listeners who enjoy original, unique, and well-performed music.The music is eastern in the sounds produced by its instruments, but Rahima's voice sounds Andulucian. (I suspect the Muslim link between Spain and Pakistan affects this.) It produces a wonderful juxtaposition performed by people who are the masters of their music."