Search - Arthur Alexander :: Lonely Just Like Me

Lonely Just Like Me
Arthur Alexander
Lonely Just Like Me
Genres: Country, Blues, World Music, Pop, R&B, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Arthur Alexander scored one of the first national hits ("You Better Move On") out of the soul-music recording center Muscle Shoals, Alabama; penned many more classic songs ("Every Day I Have to Cry," the Beatles-covered "A...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Arthur Alexander
Title: Lonely Just Like Me
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Nonesuch
Original Release Date: 3/30/1993
Release Date: 3/30/1993
Genres: Country, Blues, World Music, Pop, R&B, Classic Rock
Styles: Soul, Southern Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 075596147521, 603497100965, 075596147545

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Arthur Alexander scored one of the first national hits ("You Better Move On") out of the soul-music recording center Muscle Shoals, Alabama; penned many more classic songs ("Every Day I Have to Cry," the Beatles-covered "Anna [Go to Him]"); and quit the business in the mid-'70s to drive a community-center bus for 15 years. He made a comeback with this deeply moving country-soul album in 1993, but died suddenly less than three months after its release. An astounding last testament, Lonely Just Like Me finds Alexander's lovely, plainspoken vocal and writing style in a mood somewhere between fatalistic and generous. (A hopeful love song, "There Is a Road," and one Christian avowal, "I Believe in Miracles," end the disc on a happy note.) Alexander's revival of his own "Mr. John," the first-person monologue of a Vietnam vet's return to the home of a dead buddy's ex-girlfriend, is the standout among standouts. It climaxes with these astonishing lines: "The brother was a good man / That's what the colonel said / But a good man ain't no good / With a bullet wound in his head." --Rickey Wright

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CD Reviews

The heartbreak specialist
just one guy | where high school girls don't look like Joyce Hyse | 04/01/1999
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Arthur Alexander's LONELY JUST LIKE ME delivers about a half-dozen strong numbers. Alexander at his best rivals Roy Orbison, the Everly Brothers, and probably any other heartbreak specialist of whom you can think. For example, listen to "If It's Really Got To Be This Way" or "All The Time," great songs, but the medium (Alexander's singing) is the message, I am not kidding. The Lord called Arthur Alexander home shortly after the 1993 release of LONELY JUST LIKE ME. Hear this album now, or it's your loss."
A great album from start to finish
Jacob Weisman | San Francisco, CA | 09/24/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Arthur alexander retired from the music scene in 1975, disillusioned by the recording industry. Lonely Just Like Me displays Alexander back in full stride, his smooth voice, deeper than before, imbuing each song with a deceptive, haunting understatement. Backed by Dan Pen, Spooner Oldham, and Donnie Frits, who together with Alexander helped pioneer the Muscle Shoals sound back in the early 1960s, Lonely Just Like reprises much of Alexander's material made more famous by the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Otis Redding, Bob Dylan, and Ry Cooder than through Alexander's originals. His Songs, for the most part, are simply constructed stories of people whose lives have not worked out as well as they might have liked, but through which we can learn how to make our own way, wedding the sensibilities of country music (Alexander lists Roy Rodgers, Patty Paige, Gene Autry, and Hank Williams among his earliest influences) with a bluesy, almost fatalistic sadness."
Just Call Me Lonely...
David Wayne | Santee, CA United States | 06/15/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is the album that Arthur released just before his death in 1993. All I really have to add to what is written below, is that, at least from a standpoint of confidence, Arthur seems to be at the top of his game on this release. And this is after a hiatus of two decades since his previous recordings. On the new material, it's clear than Alexander has lost none of his ability to tell the plain truth about ordinary people in extra-ordinary situations. You can just feel that Arthur has lived through a lot of the pain he sings about. One thing I notice about listening to Arthur Alexander, is that his performances seem to be timeless. His re-recordings of songs like "Call Me Lonely" (re-titled here as "Lonely Just Like Me") and "Mr. John" are every bit as poignant as the Dot originals. In particular, I find that "Every Day I Have To Cry" and "In The Middle Of It All" sound better with each listen, no matter WHICH version I am listening to. They are great songs, and they seemed to become even greater, with each new interpretation by Arthur. Arthur Alexander was not the most popular artist of all time. The fact that his music is living on so well, is a testament of his greatness. His sides for Monument have just been re-issued, and I can't wait to get my hands on them!"