Search - Anuna :: Invocation

Invocation
Anuna
Invocation
Genres: Folk, World Music, New Age, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1


      
1

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CD Details

All Artists: Anuna
Title: Invocation
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Celtic Heartbeat/Atlantic
Release Date: 10/24/1995
Genres: Folk, World Music, New Age, Classical
Styles: British & Celtic Folk, Celtic, Europe, British Isles, Celtic New Age, Meditation, Opera & Classical Vocal
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 075678285523

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CD Reviews

Man on a mission for Anuna
Andy Agree | Omaha, NE | 05/06/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Invocation" is a stupendous musical achievement. I say this as someone who, if you looked at my music collection, you would not expect ever to hear this music, much less to buy it twice (on cassette in 1996 and on CD last year). So I'll try to put into words the several things that hooked me: 1) The sweetest, most delicate soprano singing this side of heaven ("The Last Rose", sung by Sara Clancy and "Winter Fire and Snow" and "Siuil a Riun", sung by Katie McMahon). 2) Strange, disturbing, yet thrilling harmonies that seem to delve into deep layers of wonder and awe ("Sleepsong", "Quis Est Deus", and especially "Goltrai"). 3) Humorous male vocal shenanigans ("Hin Bara"). 4) Surges of dark, mysterious urgency and excitement ("Firi Na Greine/The Rising of the Sun", and my two favorite tracks "Heia Viri" and "Song of Oisin") 5) Harmonies that are so drop-dead gorgeous I have no words for them ("Innisfree"). If you're not familiar with Anuna, they were (as of this 1996 CD) an Irish ensemble of 19 men and women (only 12 pictured in the fold-out, most looking to be in their twenties), under the direction of Michael McGlynn who has arranged original interpretations of various forms of Irish vocal music of roughly the last thousand years, with minimal instrumentation. I asked a Celt-o-phile friend where these adventurous vocal harmonies come from and she explained that through the centuries the Irish always took harmonic liberties that were discouraged by the more regimented compositional styles of Britain and mainland Europe. I'm not sure where Anuna recorded, but the CD has that live-in-a-cathedral sound that is appropriate to the music. This was their second CD. I made my way backward from this CD to their first self-titled album "Anuna", which falls short of "Invocation" by only the slightest of margins, but I have not yet made my way forward to their more recent efforts. I have promoted this CD like a missionary, as I'm doing now. I've found to my astonishment some people I expected to like it did not share my enthusiasm. But if you're one who does, and this review helps you find it, then that is why I'm writing it."
Haunting
R. Martin | Seattle, WA United States | 06/19/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Like most US Anuna fans, I was first introduced to their music when I saw Riverdance on PBS, and since that day many years ago, I have never stopped listening to this amazing Irish choral group. I have sung in choir ever since I was in fifth grade, and I can tell you that this is one of the best I've ever heard. Their sound is pure and totally integrated, meaning one part never sticks out and the whole is completely in tune. And it is a testament to Michael McGlynn's amazing talent that despite the constantly shifting membership, this choir never loses its blend; the harmonies are so closely woven together that the sound is as one voice. It quite literally takes my breath away. Invocation, Anuna's second CD, is a wonderful introduction to their music and quite worth anything you might spend. I've had my CD for many years and I listen to it quite regularly. There are many good songs; listen for the soloist Eimear Quinn on "Sleepsong;" she won the Eurovision Song Contest. Also listen for the soloist Katie McMahon on "The Last Rose;" she was the soloist for the beginning shows of Riverdance. And finally, listen for Michael himself on "Wind on Sea," with the most butter-smooth voice I've heard in a long time. Bottom line: if you love choral music, you'll never regret this purchase."