Search - Albert Ayler :: Spirits Rejoice

Spirits Rejoice
Albert Ayler
Spirits Rejoice
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

"Spirits Rejoice is proof that there was an underlying logic even to Ayler's most extreme moments, and that's why it remains a tremendously inspiring recording." - ALL MUSIC GUIDE Judson Hall (now Cami Hall), on West 57...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Albert Ayler
Title: Spirits Rejoice
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Esp Disk Ltd.
Original Release Date: 1/1/2006
Re-Release Date: 2/28/2006
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Avant Garde & Free Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 825481010207

Synopsis

Album Description
"Spirits Rejoice is proof that there was an underlying logic even to Ayler's most extreme moments, and that's why it remains a tremendously inspiring recording." - ALL MUSIC GUIDE Judson Hall (now Cami Hall), on West 57th Street in New York, was chosen by engineer David Hancock for its acoustics. On the afternoon of September 23, 1965, this private session was recorded at 30 IPS, rather than the customary 15 IPS, to achieve the highest possible fidelity.

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CD Reviews

Rejoice indeed!
Jessamine | Free, USA | 02/02/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Spirits rejoice" was recorded on September 23, 1965 at Judson Hall in New York. However, it was not a concert recording; instead Judson Hall was rented for this session because of the apparently good or at least interesting acoustics. I have to admit, I am not that impressed with the sound quality on the album, although it was apparently recorded at twice the usual speed to obtain very high fidelty. I have heard that this remastered 2006 ESP release is probably much better, and it is certainly the one to buy. Although the album is relatively similar to "Bells" in feel, not surprising given it was recorded 4 months later and with a very similar group, including Charles Tyler on alto saxophone. However, here Henry Grimes is playing wonderfully free bass and Call Cobbs is featured on harpsicord on the majestic "Angels." The contributions of these musicians clearly provide a developmental linkage between "Bells" and Albert's 1966 and 1967 work.

The album starts off with the aptly titled title track, which includes some really high-energy and ecstatic free improvisation. The second track is Holy Family, a short piece with a fast and catchy melody, and this is a pretty straight performance. In fact, you could play this track for your less Aylery friends and they probably would only raise one eyebrow. D.C. is a rather chaotic number that jumps pretty quickly into some earth-shattering improvisation; however, late in the piece there is also an imaginative interchange between Murray and Grimes that lasts for about a minute and a half, which serves to dissipate some of the energy before the theme is restated and the piece comes to an end. This latter segment, with Murray and Grimes engaged in some unconventional talking to each other, has become a real highlight for me on repeated listens. "Angels" is beautiful, as it is on "Live in Greenwich Village." The album concludes with a vibrant and screeching rendition of "Prophet." All in all, this is stuff that will really upset the neighbors - but for those of us with the acquired ears this is as joyous as music gets."