Search - Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Nikolai Golovanov, Grand Symphony Orchestra of the All-Union Radio and Television :: Tchaikovsky: Sixth Symphony; The 1812 Overture

Tchaikovsky: Sixth Symphony;  The 1812 Overture
Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Nikolai Golovanov, Grand Symphony Orchestra of the All-Union Radio and Television
Tchaikovsky: Sixth Symphony; The 1812 Overture
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #1


      

CD Details

All Artists: Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky, Nikolai Golovanov, Grand Symphony Orchestra of the All-Union Radio and Television
Title: Tchaikovsky: Sixth Symphony; The 1812 Overture
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Boheme Golo
Original Release Date: 1/1/1948
Re-Release Date: 9/26/2000
Genre: Classical
Styles: Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century, Symphonies
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 460241081037
 

CD Reviews

An Astonishing, Utterly Subjective Pathetique
Jeffrey Lipscomb | Sacramento, CA United States | 04/20/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Back in the 1970's, I started collecting everything I could find of Golovanov's uniquely inspired and visionary performances. These were mostly on imported Melodiya LPs that had pretty awful recorded sound. So far as I know, this 1948 "live" recording of Tchaikovsky's "Pathetique" was never issued on LP. The recorded sound is surprisingly good for its era. This performance is, without doubt, the most "over the top," completely subjective reading of ANY major orchestral work known to me. You will probably either love it or hate it. The 1812 Overture (with Glinka interpolated in lieu of the conventional "God Save The Tsar," an example of Soviet revisionism at its most blatant) is also "live." It has already appeared in poorer sound on Golovanov's "Great Conductors" volume for IMG.

Golovanov's virtual re-sculpting of Tchaikovsky's notes will surely infuriate those who insist on strict adherence to the printed score. But to my ears, Golovanov's unique mixture of passion and tenderness is revelatory. There is really little here to compare with my other long-time favorites (Furtwangler in the symphony and Mengelberg in the 1812). This is quite simply a one-of-a-kind, no-holds-barred style of conducting that has become completely extinct. I think we're the poorer for that.

As a testament from one of Russia's all-time great conductors, this CD is a real ear-opener.

Not to be missed."