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Technology Won't Save Us
Sophia
Technology Won't Save Us
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #2

Limited Edition two CD digipak pressing of the 2007 release from Sophia, the full-time side-project from former God Machine leader (and Flower Shop Records label head) Robin Proper-Sheppard, featuring a bonus disc that inc...  more »

     
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CD Details

All Artists: Sophia
Title: Technology Won't Save Us
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Flowershop/Redeye
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 4/29/2008
Album Type: Extra tracks
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPCs: 5028246002324, 823566454328

Synopsis

Album Description
Limited Edition two CD digipak pressing of the 2007 release from Sophia, the full-time side-project from former God Machine leader (and Flower Shop Records label head) Robin Proper-Sheppard, featuring a bonus disc that includes acoustic versions of six tracks: 'Bastards', 'I Left You', 'Oh My Love', 'I'd Rather', 'Swept Back' and 'Pace'. Sophia began shortly after the untimely death of God Machine bassist (and close friend) Jimmy Fernandez. Robin's emotionally introspective songwriting began to sound nothing like God Machine, so he created a new musical outlet for these songs, eventually settling on the name Sophia. Originally compared to acts like Sparklehorse and Neil Young, Sophia have matured into something so much more. Flower Shop.
 

CD Reviews

City Lovelost
Tony Adams | Glasgow, Scotland | 08/04/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Of all the Sophia albums this one bridges the gap between Robin Proper-Sheppard now and Robin Proper-Sheppard of The God Machine, his first band rendered defunct almost 14 years ago by the suicide of bassist Jimmy Fernandez. Where previous Sophia albums have relied on stark musings of death accompanied by Proper-Sheppards mournful strumming and sparse arrangements, this record follows on from what was suggested with 2004's People Are Like Seasons. Full band participation really fleshes out these songs of lost love, urban malaise and death, a theme Proper-Sheppard will probably always try to deal with. The guitars are louder, especially on the opening title track, the strings are prominent, the lovely Where Are You Now with it's repeated refrain sounding more and more desperate as the song builds and his voice has never sounded better. This is still quite "miserable" music albeit more dynamic than standard slo-core recording artists, however it's the kind of music that ultimately lifts you up instead of dragging you down."