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Samuel Jones: Symphony No. 3, & 'Palo Duro Canyon', Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra
Jones, Olka, Seattle Symphony
Samuel Jones: Symphony No. 3, & 'Palo Duro Canyon', Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #1

'Samuel Jones is a sensitive musician — with great imagination, and he is a real — craftsman. These works should be part — of the core of the great American — repertoire' (Gerard Schwarz). Of his — Symphony No. 3, Jones writes:...  more »

     
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CD Details

All Artists: Jones, Olka, Seattle Symphony, Schwarz
Title: Samuel Jones: Symphony No. 3, & 'Palo Duro Canyon', Concerto for Tuba and Orchestra
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Naxos American
Original Release Date: 1/1/2009
Re-Release Date: 2/24/2009
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Concertos, Symphonies
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 636943937822

Synopsis

Product Description
'Samuel Jones is a sensitive musician
with great imagination, and he is a real
craftsman. These works should be part
of the core of the great American
repertoire' (Gerard Schwarz). Of his
Symphony No. 3, Jones writes:
'I wanted to capture in music that
magical moment which everyone
experiences when they first see the flat,
treeless high plains fall dizzyingly away
into the colorful vastness of the Palo
Duro Canyon itself.' His Tuba Concerto,
which Schwarz regards as 'the finest
solo work for that instrument ever
produced' was composed for the
performers on this disc to showcase the
instrument s amazing range, agility and
versatility and to spotlight Christopher
Olka's great artistry.

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CD Reviews

Fantastic symphony
Craig Jackson | Texas | 10/14/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Tuba symphonies are somewhat rare beasts, I guess because the tuba has mostly been considered an accompanying instrument rather than a lead instrument; nonetheless, Samuel Jones has served society well by writing a stunning opus that drags the listeners from his world into an imaginary adventure across the West, and Olka adds immeasurably with his grand performance on the tuba. This CD should be a part of everyone's classical collection and should be played live regularly at concert halls. Kudos to those who made it happen."
Great CD
Norman Smith | Bellevue, WA | 03/28/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Chris Olka doing what he does best. A fabulous performance of a beastly difficult, new work for tuba and orchestra. Difficult for the performer, but for the listener, quite accessible."
Massive--though brief--symphonic works!
Gary D. Warner | Saginaw, MI | 11/27/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Artistically, may I boldly underscore the luminous, outstanding qualities of this fabulously exciting symphony as both richly textural and vividly colorful. Coincidentally, the same comment may be applied to Naxos' stupendous sound engineering of this first rate performance by the Seattle Symphony.

Substantively, although of indubitably contrasting signature style and duration, this work's massive power and complexity reminds me of Mahler's Sixth. It is fascinating, awe-inspiring, and refulgently replete with layered yet transparent character. The biggest letdown is that this one movement symphony is just over too soon. At under twenty-four minutes in length, it leaves me begging for more. Do understand however, that's a big kudo, not a dig. A protege of the great Howard Hanson, the distinguished composer (with an earned doctorate in the field) masterfully uses the brief time package to efficiently speak volumes musically. In this respect, he immediately reminds me of Sibelius.

The concerto is just as compelling although I must confess that personally I have yet to take a shine to the tuba as a featured solo instrument. Beyond question, the virtuosic prowess of Mr. Olka marvelously showcases the tuba's range of capabilities as far more than just a supportive instrument.

This all begs the question, where are recordings of the good doctor's first two symphonies?
"