Search - James Naughton :: It's About Time

It's About Time
James Naughton
It's About Time
Genres: Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

Singers with lesser credits have rushed to release albums, but James Naughton, who got praise for turns in City of Angels and Chicago, took his sweet time before putting out a studio record. And then, instead of wearing th...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: James Naughton
Title: It's About Time
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Drg
Release Date: 10/8/2002
Genres: Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Easy Listening, Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 021471147322

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Singers with lesser credits have rushed to release albums, but James Naughton, who got praise for turns in City of Angels and Chicago, took his sweet time before putting out a studio record. And then, instead of wearing the traditional tux, he posed for the cover of his big debut in a safari outfit looking as if he'd just returned from Kenya. But never mind. Naughton lays out his M.O. from the start when the first words he sings are "Free and easy, that's my style" in Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer's "Every Place I Hang My Hat Is Home." The song is indicative of both Naughton's approach and a conservative song selection (the few tracks that depart from the classic American Songbook include Tom Waits's "Invitation to the Blues," Lyle Lovett's "She's No Lady," and Randy Newman's "Marie"). So, do we need another version of "Makin' Whoopee"? Not necessarily, but taken together, the songs nicely form a suave, laid-back whole. --Elisabeth Vincentelli

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CD Reviews

Mr. Nexium, Cialis, etc, himself
L. Ackerman | Ashburn, VA (USA) | 03/27/2005
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Nice ride. Maybe not the sum of its parts. But is it strictly Naughton's fault? He started on Broadway and did very nice things there. His speaking voice is truly famous (unfortunately, over-exposed in so many commercials), his diction, ergo, stunning, and he sings warmly. But something in the whole is missing. A feeling of sameness perhaps? Your call."