Search - Johann Sebastian Bach, Domenico Scarlatti, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach :: The Glenn Gould Silver Jubilee Album

The Glenn Gould Silver Jubilee Album
Johann Sebastian Bach, Domenico Scarlatti, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach
The Glenn Gould Silver Jubilee Album
Genres: Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (15) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (1) - Disc #2

Originally released in 1980, the Gould Silver Jubilee Album brought together unreleased odds and ends culled from Gould's recording sessions. They have since been spread across Sony's Glenn Gould Edition. A Glenn Gould Fan...  more »

      
?

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details


Synopsis

Amazon.com
Originally released in 1980, the Gould Silver Jubilee Album brought together unreleased odds and ends culled from Gould's recording sessions. They have since been spread across Sony's Glenn Gould Edition. A Glenn Gould Fantasy, a comic discussion involving Gould's character-voice alter egos bantering back and forth, appears on CD for the first time, along with Critics Call-Out Corner. The humor is stilted, contrived, and interesting only to true believers. Likewise, a previously unreleased 1981 Bach Italian Concerto seems static and self-conscious compared to the pianist's glorious 1959 recording. Still, Gould completists will certainly want to give this set a look-see. --Jed Distler
 

CD Reviews

This CD opened Glenn Gould for me
Vagif Abilov | Kolbotn Norway | 08/05/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I must admit I knew very little about Glenn Gould until I received this CD as a present. I put it into my car's CD player (not the best place to listen to classical music), and for several weeks I didn't change CDs - I just listened to this one! My absolute favourite is C.P.E. Bach's sonata."
Insight into the real Glenn Gould
R. Rosso | trackless terrain, the North | 02/09/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Glenn Gould was highly sensitive to criticism. Yet he often was the recipient of it, critiqued for playing Bach on the piano, for playing Mozart too fast, or too slow, or both. In "A Glenn Gould Fantasy," Mr. Gould creates for himself the opportunity to respond to his critics (most played by himself in amusing voices) - who have names like Karlheinz Kloppweiser (an eager German proponent of polyphony) and Theodore Slutz (a mellow New York beatnik). Mr. Gould was also famous for giving up concertizing, a result of his fear of leaving even the tiniest detail to chance. So the fantasy concludes with a mock performance by Gould on a sinking oil tanker in the arctic.

Glenn Gould is usually presented to us as an intensely serious Artist. This is a wonderful reminder of his humanity and silly sense of humor.

Listeners should be warned that the fantasy is chock full of inside jokes and musicological silliness that may be lost on them if they are not familiar with Gould's idiosyncracies, the criticisms of his style, or 20th century musical trends. (For example, if the idea of a "Kodaly Kindergarten" is funny to you, as it is to me, you'll like this. If not, save your money.) In keeping with his personality, Glenn Gould is not concerned here with whether anyone else gets the joke. But if you do get the joke, it's pretty funny. It's also a fascinating window into Mr. Gould as a man and an artist."
Gould's 2nd Italian Concerto Recording
Forrest G. Stewart | 10/26/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"As much as I have always found great pleasure in Glenn Gould's original record of the Bach Italian Concerto, I must admit that his second version was NOT a disappointment to me. Like his later interpretation of the Goldberg Variations, the newer Italian Concerto sounds less mechanical--less computer-like--and more human than the first record. That this 1981 recording seems less brilliant is due primarily, I think, to the very mellow tone of the piano used, rather than to big changes in the pianist's technique. Gould's first piano had a much brighter tone. However, in the higher notes of the piece, the new piano affords the performer a breath-taking legato that is very song-like and much more soulful, so to speak."