Search - Didier Henry, Maurice Durufle, Michel Piquemal :: Duruflé: Sacred Choral & Organ Works, Vol. 1

Duruflé: Sacred Choral & Organ Works, Vol. 1
Didier Henry, Maurice Durufle, Michel Piquemal
Duruflé: Sacred Choral & Organ Works, Vol. 1
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (17) - Disc #1

Ah, such pretty music. Durufle was one of those French mystical types--full of Gregorian chant-inspired melody. His organ music is thoroughly typical of his small but immaculately crafted output. The Scherzo is a real ch...  more »

     
?

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: Didier Henry, Maurice Durufle, Michel Piquemal, Beatrice Uria-Monzon, City Orchestra, Orchestre de la Cité, Eric Lebrun
Title: Duruflé: Sacred Choral & Organ Works, Vol. 1
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Naxos
Release Date: 9/19/1995
Genre: Classical
Styles: Opera & Classical Vocal, Historical Periods, Early Music
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 730099419628

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Ah, such pretty music. Durufle was one of those French mystical types--full of Gregorian chant-inspired melody. His organ music is thoroughly typical of his small but immaculately crafted output. The Scherzo is a real charmer, while the Prelude and fugue pays affectionate tribute to a talented colleague. His Requiem became so popular that the composer arranged it for every instrumental combination except perhaps kazoo orchestra. This version is the one featuring a big solo organ part (with chamber orchestra), and it's well performed and recorded. Piquemal's vocal ensemble isn't the last word in polish, but they sing with enthusiasm and fans of the composer need not hesitate. --David Hurwitz

Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

Great, but not the greatest
Samer T Ismail | Danbury, CT | 04/17/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is a recording of the "reduced orchestration" version of the Duruflé Requiem. It's scored for trumpets, timpani, harp, strings (in addition to the solo cello), and organ. The added instruments give it a somewhat warmer feeling than the organ-and-cello only version (available on Hyperion), and a somewhat smaller, more intimate feeling than the full orchestra version (perhaps my favorite version, especially Robert Shaw's Telarc recording).Piquemal et al. turn in an admirable performance. My two favorite moments are the climactic "Dies irae" section in the "Libera me," where the smaller forces actually sound, in their own way, *more* ominous than in larger versions; and the "In Paradisum," where the chorus gives an ethereal sound missed by most other versions. The only downside is that Beatrice Uria-Manzon has a shade too much vibrato in the central "Pie Jesu," but certainly not enough to make you want to skip ver that track.The extras at the end of the CD are good; while this isn't the best recording available (and perhaps not even of the reduced version--Dennis Keene offers another excellent recording on Delos)--it's certainly the best bargain."