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Brahms: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2; Haydn Variations; Tragic Overture; Academic Festival Overture
Johannes Brahms, John Barbirolli, New Philharmonia Orchestra
Brahms: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2; Haydn Variations; Tragic Overture; Academic Festival Overture
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #2


     
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CD Details

All Artists: Johannes Brahms, John Barbirolli, New Philharmonia Orchestra, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Daniel Barenboim
Title: Brahms: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2; Haydn Variations; Tragic Overture; Academic Festival Overture
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: EMI Classics
Original Release Date: 1/1/2006
Re-Release Date: 2/21/2006
Album Type: Original recording remastered
Genre: Classical
Styles: Forms & Genres, Concertos, Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century, Instruments, Keyboard, Symphonies
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 724347693922
 

CD Reviews

The latest incarnation of a great collaboration
Santa Fe Listener | Santa Fe, NM USA | 07/24/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Because the two Brahms piano concertos have been recorded so often, not enough new liisteners may know about this 1967 set from Barenboim and Barbirolli. These are grand, broad readings--the Second Concerto in particular is among the slowest on record. Don't mistake that for lack of drama. Barenboim throws himself into every note, and the sympathy between conductor and soloist reaches very deep emotionally (Gilels and Jochum, also slow, sound ponderous and "official" by comparison.) Barbirolli and Barenboim give themselves time to phrase with great expressivity, but what really keeps the tempo from lagging is Barenboim's powerful pianism, abetted by EMI's under-the-lid miking. There's not a seocnd when the piano sound isn't two inches from your ears--it's as thrilling as sitting on the bench beside Barenboim. Barbirolli captures the Jovial essence of the Academic Festival Over. quite wonderfully, as he does the dark drama of the Tragic Over.

Nothing here is less than memorable. If you want to hear Brahms interpreted very personally, as if he really matters, this set is one of a kind.
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