Search - Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, Rudolf Werthen :: Vivaldi: The Four Seasons (For Harp and Orchestra)

Vivaldi: The Four Seasons (For Harp and Orchestra)
Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, Rudolf Werthen
Vivaldi: The Four Seasons (For Harp and Orchestra)
Genres: Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (18) - Disc #1

No Description Available. Genre: Classical Music Media Format: Compact Disk Rating: Release Date: 26-OCT-1999

      
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Product Description
No Description Available.
Genre: Classical Music
Media Format: Compact Disk
Rating:
Release Date: 26-OCT-1999

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CD Reviews

Virtuoso meets Vivaldi
11/07/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I admit I was a bit skeptical to see this on the store racks. Vivaldi's famous concertos with solo harp spotlighted? Hmm... However, I went ahead and got it, as I am a fan of Telarc. I was not disappointed. The string orchestra, the marvelous I Fiamminghi, and Ms. Kondonassis were impeccable! It seemed as thought their performance was as natural as it ought to sound. This is a great rendition of the "Four Seasons" and a must for any Vivaldi fan."
"The Four Seasons" in an Exciting New Way!
Kevin Currie-Knight | Newark, Delaware | 12/29/2005
(4 out of 5 stars)

"One of my favorite "classical" instruments is the harp. Unfortunately for me (and other harp fans), most harp music consists of pretty and sparkling show pieces full of glissandos and little else. Yes, save for the recorder, the harp is one of the hardest instrument for which to find good, engrossing music.

And this is why I like Yolanda Kondonassis so much! One of the oh-so-few pioneers in the harp world, she has mastered the art of transcribing and playing music not originally for the harp to sound like it could be played on no other instrument. Satie's "Gnossienne," Mendelssohn's "Songs Without Words," and now, Vivaldi's "Four Seasons."

Again, Kondonassis does the trick. Who would have thought that concertos for violin - in parts, agressive; in others, weepy - could translate so well to the harp? Yes, some of the augustness of the Allegros (and a Presto) aren't as snappy as with a violin, but the concertos take on a whole new - and just as pleasing - character.

What makes this work so well is Kondonassis's understanding that one cannot simply change the lead violin to a harp and leave it at that. In certain movements ("Spring's" Largo, for instance), the lead violin is kept as is, and the harp plays a supporting role. In other movements, ("Autumn's" Adagio molto) the harp takes over, not for the violin, but for the harpsichord. Kondassis does not force the harp into situations for which it is not equipped. Rather, she weaves the harp in using tase and tact.

T(he only movement in which the harp sounded akward was the all-too-well-known allegro of "Spring." The harp did not project well amidst the other strings. It is ashame, given that this is the lead-off movement, and one so well known.)

But all-in-all, I think Kondonassis scores big points with this one. Thanks to her, there is one more great work in the harp's repotoire!"
Fabulous CD
L. M. Rhea | Franklin, TN USA | 06/11/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Yolanda Kondonassis is the very best of world harpists. You will not be disappointed. This is fabulous."