Search - Giuseppe Verdi, Gianandrea Gavazzeni, La Scala Theater Orchestra & Chorus :: Verdi: Il Trovatore

Verdi: Il Trovatore
Giuseppe Verdi, Gianandrea Gavazzeni, La Scala Theater Orchestra & Chorus
Verdi: Il Trovatore
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (29) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (20) - Disc #2

Here is a live performance from Moscow, with the La Scala forces, taped in 1964. Gabriella Tucci, a fine singer who was only lacking the individual timbre needed for stardom, is an excellent Leonora, and Carlo Bergonzi is ...  more »

      
?

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details


Synopsis

Amazon.com
Here is a live performance from Moscow, with the La Scala forces, taped in 1964. Gabriella Tucci, a fine singer who was only lacking the individual timbre needed for stardom, is an excellent Leonora, and Carlo Bergonzi is among the most elegant and stirring Manricos on disc. Giulietta Simionato, nearing the end of her career, sings with great passion as the crazy Azucena, and Piero Cappuccilli delivers a big Count de Luna. Gianandrea Gavazzeni, an old hand obviously trying to impress those cold-war Russkies, pulls out all the stops, along with his cast. This one is near the top of the list. --Robert Levine
 

CD Reviews

Our Amazing Stars in Moscow
Ricardo Ha(tamino93@hotmail.com) | Seoul, Corea | 09/11/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This recording is set in Moscow as La Scala's opera tour. For the names of the singers you may choice this set without any hesitation. Of couse, all the singers are pretty good. Although Simionato is already old, she sings still exactly. And Tucci is in her pick. She's cool! Cappuccilli is normal. But our Bergonzi is not so good at that time and "Di quella pira"is downed in a half-note. The reaction of Moscow's audience is very passionate. But remastering isn't a little satisfying. But I'd like to tell you, only if you love this opera, to buy this set."
An Excellent Il Trovatore
A student | 11/28/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This recording of Il Trovatore is underappreciated. It features an all-star cast with an excellent conductor. Carlo Bergonzi is one of the best Manricos alive. He sings with dramatic intensity, which is relevant in his "Infida!" in Act I. Bergonzi's finest moment in the opera is his High Cs at the end of "Di quella pira." Gabriella Tucci is an under recorded opera star. Her Leonora is one of the best around today. Her vocal beauty is apparent in "Tacea la notte," and "Di tale amor." Piero Cappuccilli is one of my favorite baritones, so his presence on this CD influenced me to purchase it. His powerful baritone voice is perfect for Count di Luna. His "Il balen" is absoutely wonderful. Giulietta Simionato is THE Azucena. Her "Stride la vampa" is great, and her best moment. She sounds just like a crazy gypsy mother seeking revenge on the Count. The supporting singers ae also great. Ivo Vinco is a commanding Ferrando. Piero de Palma is one of my favorite "supporting singers", and is excellent as Ruiz. Conductor Gianandrea Gavazzeni is a superb conductor, and pulls out everything he has to impress the Moscow audience."
Excellent
BDSinC | Calgary, Alberta, Canada | 12/04/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Firstly, for a live recording, I have to say the sound it top notch! This is really a wonderful recording, and it does reflect the practices of the times (the Cabaletta after the famous Miseria for Leonora is cut, which was a common practice at the time, yet, a stupid one to me, for if the soprano can sing the coloratura's of the first act, she would have no worries in this aria, for it is far easier). What I find sad is that these great singers recorded so little together. Each recorded some on their own, and with other singers, but they work so well together. Tucci sings a wonderful Leonora, and she actually has a very beautiful trill. Some say her voice just wasn't individual enough to make her a star. I find her voice very individual, and I find I have no trouble instantly identifying her when I hear her sing, however, she does remind one of Stella a great deal. Bergonzi has always been a favorite Manrico, but not the only tenor I enjoy in the part (I love Corelli, Domingo, Di Stephano, del Monaco, and each for very unique reasons). He brings a very lyric quality to the role, one of a young lover, even if in the super dramatic moments there are others who really do a more compelling job. Cappuccilli is his "not-at-all-subltle" self (I don't think he ever sang a role without reminding you of a bull in a china shop, but no matter how loud and large he was in voice, it works here beautifully). However he works well with the other principles. Then there is the famous Simionato, and I have to say my most favorite Azucena ever. I wish she recorded the role with the high C that it contains, for she did sing it that way on occasion (but not often, as she really stuck more to performing practices of the day), yet, at this stage in her career, I am sure that note was beyond her. I think this is one of the only times (excepting a newer recording out with Pavarotti containing the Azucena of Verrot, and she is nearly her 70's when she made that recording) we actually hear the singer portraying the role who is close to the age of the role (we make that comment sometimes in regard to sopranos who are at last young enough to match the age of the heroine they are portraying, but we seldom think of it in terms of being old enough to reflect the age of the person they are portraying). Personally, no matter the actual shortcomings of Simionato in this role, I really think being the correct age for the gypsy mother only adds to the reality of the part. We are hearing an old wornout person who deeply reflects the distructive forces of a life filled with hate. Simionato's age works for her making this portayal very real, and very authentic to that sort of a person. It is very true that there are moments one is forced to listen to some real struggling to get out the music, but again, I don't see that as a draw back at all. It only makes her suffering all the more real, the pains of life actually gulping away her ability to speak. This is an electric Trovatore, and sadly, we NEVER see that in the theater today. The singers either have voices far too small for the roles, or are too intent on sounding pretty, and all the drama is lost."