Search - Various Artists :: Souled on Reggae

Souled on Reggae
Various Artists
Souled on Reggae
Genres: Alternative Rock, World Music, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (15) - Disc #1

Early reggae artists were known for plucking obscure American soul and R&B gems from obscurity by giving them a revitalizing reggae makeover. As reggae gained status and took on the credo of the emerging Rastafarian faith,...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Souled on Reggae
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Music Club
Original Release Date: 2/16/1999
Release Date: 2/16/1999
Genres: Alternative Rock, World Music, Pop
Styles: Ska, Reggae
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 614475009224

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Early reggae artists were known for plucking obscure American soul and R&B gems from obscurity by giving them a revitalizing reggae makeover. As reggae gained status and took on the credo of the emerging Rastafarian faith, it found its own voice and message. Still, reggae's always had a core of soul, and the merger makes sweet sense. U.S. indie label Pow Wow has made waves with three rock-to-reggae cover records, so it's totally fitting and somewhat overdue for reggae to rewind to its past with these 15 interpretations of some of America's leading soul anthems by a reggae vocalist elite. The marriage of material and talent here is consistently tasty, and it's hard to single out favorites. But Al Brown--a Toots Hibbert sound-alike--with Skin, Flesh & Bones delivers a rousing reggaematic version of "Here I Am Baby" that captures that old soul feel. The inimitable Big Youth wails the heck out of "Wake Up Everybody." Derrick Harriott's cover of "The Loser" was a huge hit back in the day, and it makes a great fit in this collection. John Holt, former lead singer for the Paragons, draws every possible nuance from "Never, Never, Never" with that smooth crooning style. Reggae's crown prince, Dennis Brown, whose towering career was built on a canny balance between covers and searing originals, contributes his interpretation of "Let Me Down Easy"; Ken Boothe, one of the music's finest veteran singers in a funky soul-man mode, turns it loose for "(It's the Way) Nature Planned It." The Heptones kill with music on "Swept for You." A lilting rhythm track underpins Chosen Few's sublime "Everybody Plays the Fool," and Slim Smith's rendition of "Sitting in the Park" possesses a hushed, exotically accented aura that elevates it even above the original. So it goes throughout, with equally revelatory turns by Toots & the Maytals, the Techniques, and Tony Jay with the great Alton Ellis that should appeal equally to reggae fans and any connoisseur of soulful music, no matter what the genre. --Elena Oumano