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Pebbles 7: Chicago Part 2
Various Artists
Pebbles 7: Chicago Part 2
Genres: Alternative Rock, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (23) - Disc #1

Subtitled - Chicago 2. The second of the Chicago area-related Pebbles compilations, drawn from various Pebbles High Times & other compilations. 23 tracks of original '60s punk & psych classics. AIP. 1994.

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Pebbles 7: Chicago Part 2
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Archive Int'l / Aip
Release Date: 1/1/1995
Genres: Alternative Rock, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
Styles: By Decade, 1960s, Psychedelic Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 095081502420, 0095081502420, 4024572289379

Synopsis

Album Description
Subtitled - Chicago 2. The second of the Chicago area-related Pebbles compilations, drawn from various Pebbles High Times & other compilations. 23 tracks of original '60s punk & psych classics. AIP. 1994.
 

CD Reviews

More barrel scrapings from Chicago
Laszlo Matyas | 06/05/2007
(2 out of 5 stars)

"The second entry in the Pebbles series to focus exclusively on garage rock from the Chicago area doesn't fare any better than its lackluster predecessor. While other Pebbles volumes were stuffed from end to end with classics, this disc is full of dull, unoriginal tunes that wallow in tired garage rock cliches.

There are a few good songs: The Lost Agency's "One Girl Man" is an excellent punk pounder that boasts sneering vocals, and the Trolls' "Every Day & Every Night" is a roaringly catchy tune with some truly hilarious lyrics. The Children of Darkness' "Sugar Shack A Go Go" is a drunken, stomping frat-rocker. Gary & The Knight Lites' "Take Me Back" is pure bouncing garage-pop, and The Malibus' cover of the Animals' classic "I'm Cryin'" is almost as rollicking as the original. The Berries' "What in the World" is a catchy three chord pounder with a cool harmonica solo, while Lord & The Flies' "Echoes" is almost as good as the group's name. And... that's about it.

Practically everything else on this disc is somewhere between mediocre and awful. Oscar & the Majestics provide an incredibly lame version of the Who's "I Can't Explain," while The Factory's rendition of the R&B standard "High Blood Pressure" foreshadows the worst of 70s blues rock. Von Ruden's take on the Rolling Stones' "The Spider And The Fly" is a dull, formless mess. Robby Brelyn's "Hana" features an annoying (and somewhat creepy) vocal backed by a completely uninteresting fuzz guitar/ drum thing. Jimmy Null & the Inversions' "I Still Care For You" is a pointless bit of wanna-be Buddy Holly-ing. Worst of all is Barney Pip's unspeakably bad cover of the Hombres' "Let It All Hang Out-" everything about the version, from its unoriginal music to its annoyingly weird vocals, exemplifies the absolute worst aspects of 60s garage rock.

Sorry kids, but this one's for garage rock completeists only."