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Hear 'N Aid
Various Artists
Hear 'N Aid
Genres: Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1

The Heavy Metal Amalgamation that Answered the Call to Help Fight World Hunger Organized by Ronnie James Dio. It Didn't Raise as Much as Other Superstar Efforts, but Did Respectably Nonetheless. Contributions to the Album ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Hear 'N Aid
Members Wishing: 17
Total Copies: 0
Label: Polygram Int'l
Release Date: 6/13/2000
Album Type: Import
Genres: Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Styles: By Decade, 1980s, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR), Glam, Pop Metal
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Details
The Heavy Metal Amalgamation that Answered the Call to Help Fight World Hunger Organized by Ronnie James Dio. It Didn't Raise as Much as Other Superstar Efforts, but Did Respectably Nonetheless. Contributions to the Album Come from Accept, Motorhead, Rush, Kiss, Dio, Y&t, the Scorpions and a Posthumous Performance Dredged Up from Jimi Hendrix.

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CD Reviews

Godly
e5150 | United States | 10/20/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"What can you say about this other than "WOW!"? RJD wrote the title track with Vivian Campbell and that perpetually drunk-looking bass player of his. With backing tracks recorded by the DIO band (with a second drum kit handled by Quiet Riot drummer Franki Banali), it's a metal monster which sounds quite a bit like the DIO classic "Rainbow in the Dark". He invited MANY (not ALL) of the top metal merchants of the time (and some second- and third-tier players to fill the gaps in the choir) to perform vocals or participate in the nearly endless guitar solo. The guitar solo is the STAR here, with many of the soloists giving literally the performance of their lives. Of course Yngwie, still a relative unknown at the time, blows them away, but George Lynch, Craig Goldy, Vivian Campbell, and even Neal Schon (?!) shred it up beautifully. Dave Murray and Adrian Smith of Iron Maiden are invited to do what they do best and provide a harmony line for the chorus music. It's sad that they didn't actually solo, though. I would have infinitely preferred to hear their unique talents instead of Twisted Sister's guitarist or Buck Dharma of Blue Oyster Cult. Not that there's anything wrong with those two, it's just that their performances don't quite match up to the blistering fretwork standards set by the aforementioned shredders. Yes, Neal Schon really lets loose and makes you wonder "What the hell is he doing in Journey?"Vocal-wise you've got mostly Ronnie James God showing off his pipes, but he kindly shares the verses with Don Dokken, Kevin DuBrow, Rob Halford, Geoff Tate, and a few also-rans who all do an amazing job. Vince Neil was in the choir, but I'm shocked he wasn't given a verse lyric to sing, considering he was probably the most popular guy there at the time. Probably would have boosted sales as all the teenaged rocker sl*ts would buy it for his presence.Other songs are included on this compilation, donated by bands who couldn't perform on the title track, but who cares. STARS is the main reason to buy this, and is worth every penny. This one song basically defines the heavy metal of the 80s (NOT glam, but the REAL metal)."
Long live "Stars"
Medio | 06/20/2004
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Granted the lyrics are not shakespeare, and the five minute guitar solo may seem excessive, but the song "Stars" still reminds me why I fell in love with classic metal.
The vocals are great, the solos are super rockin', and face it, this song at the time(compared to "we are the world" and the "band aid$Q[Is this the song name?])is like comparing Slayer to Michael Jackson. I would give the song 5 stars if the lyrics were just a smidge better(it receives 4 stars for quality, but 5 stars for emotional attachment from when I was 11), and the album receives 3 stars as a whole(the contributing artists could have put out original songs, or unrecorded b-sides, instead of rushed live recordings of the songs besides Stars. All in all I feel as if I'm back in 85, before Poison and Warrant made metal a joke, when I listen to this album."