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Great Bluesmen/Newport
Various Artists
Great Bluesmen/Newport
Genres: Blues, Folk, Special Interest, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (21) - Disc #1

While the likes of Chess and Delmark were wellsprings of '60s electric blues, Vanguard carved out a concurrent niche as a harbor for aging country bluesmen. It was a natural match since the gentler likes of Sleepy John Est...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists
Title: Great Bluesmen/Newport
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Vanguard Records
Release Date: 9/16/1991
Album Type: Live
Genres: Blues, Folk, Special Interest, Pop
Styles: Delta Blues, Traditional Blues, Regional Blues, East Coast Blues, Electric Blues, Acoustic Blues, Traditional Folk, By Decade, 1960s
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 015707007726, 015707007719, 015707007740, 015707777841, 090204500321

Synopsis

Amazon.com
While the likes of Chess and Delmark were wellsprings of '60s electric blues, Vanguard carved out a concurrent niche as a harbor for aging country bluesmen. It was a natural match since the gentler likes of Sleepy John Estes and Mississippi John Hurt went over well with the label's core folk audience. The coalition extended to the Newport Folk Festival, which was much more receptive to acoustic blues than their amplified Chicago offspring. Great Bluesmen/Newport (originally a two-LP set) presents 21 tracks culled from late '50s and mid-'60s performances at the Newport Folk Festival. A consistently rewarding collection, Great Bluesmen nevertheless has its highlights, foremost being John Lee Hooker's brooding "Tupelo." But with Son House, Skip James, Mississippi Fred McDowell, and Lightnin' Hopkins in evidence, how can a folk-blues fan go wrong? --Steven Stolder
 

CD Reviews

THIS is the blues!
07/08/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Anyone looking for the real thing, the delta blues done by the real delta bluesmen, this compilation of acoustic performances at the Newport Folk Festival in the late 50's to early 60's is it. The old guys had their mothballs dusted off and were trotted out for the new, pre-rock 'n' roll folkies of the time, and a revival was born. Now, in the new millennium, this stuff sounds as fresh and hot (or cool, as the case may be) as it did in the decades before it was recorded. These guys aren't around anymore, but you can still listen to the REAL blues, as it was, as it is, as it should be."