Search - Uncle Tupelo :: Still Feel Gone

Still Feel Gone
Uncle Tupelo
Still Feel Gone
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Before March 16-20, 1992 secured Uncle Tupelo as Commanders in Chief of the alt country assault during the early '90s, Still Feel Gone stated emphatically that this foursome are no musical tumbleweeds. Though twangy, lap-s...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Uncle Tupelo
Title: Still Feel Gone
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rockville
Original Release Date: 10/19/1992
Re-Release Date: 9/17/1991
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Styles: Americana, Indie & Lo-Fi, American Alternative, Roots Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 017531607028, 017531607042, 5099751073123

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Before March 16-20, 1992 secured Uncle Tupelo as Commanders in Chief of the alt country assault during the early '90s, Still Feel Gone stated emphatically that this foursome are no musical tumbleweeds. Though twangy, lap-steel-heavy ditties like "Watch Me Fall" and "Still Be Around" cradle a country heart, the bulk of this disc is a nod to Uncle Tupelo's garage and punk rock heritage. The songs find their hooks in the twittery vocals of Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy, but beware the rapid fire drumming from Mike Heidorn. When Uncle Tupelo fires up it's tribute to late-Minuteman D. Boon, you'll realize there's more to these country boys than meets the ear. --Nick Heil

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CD Reviews

Awesome alt-country, on the aggressive side
Jason Kent | Anchorage, Alaska United States | 12/29/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"While I think Anodyne is their best album, Still Feel Gone is also a very, very good album. Of UT's 4 recordings, Still Feel Gone is the most similar to their debut album, the album that started it all, No Depression. However Still Feel Gone more than picks up where No Depression left off, it surpasses it. Still Feel Gone will appeal to those with more rock sensibilities than folk or country, as Ferrar & Tweedy seem to pay homage to the great punk bands of the 80's by getting drunk off whiskey in a midwestern small-town bar and going cow-tipping. Then throwing up."
5 Stars, and Still Not Their Best
PopTodd | United States | 02/12/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Yup, I think their debut - No Depression - is more solid front and back. But this is still a classic album in my book. From the grungy abrasive opening of "Gun" that magically melts into a simply terrific power pop tune, to the lyrical masterpiece that is "Still Be Around" ("When your bible is the bottle/And the hardwood floor is home/Morning comes twice a day/Or not at all...")The split between Farrar's more traditional bend and Tweedy's poppier style first surfaces here. Although I only realized this in retrospect. But still an amazingly cohesive album that looses just a touch of steam toward the end.Stylistically, much more in line with No Depression than Anodyne, and by no means a disapointment."
Buy This CD!
PopTodd | 06/25/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"What a shame that this group never got their due while they were together. The first song "Gun" is the closest to pop that they ever got. It should have been a hit single. I used to hate country music but after hearing UT I realize what I really hated was and is the glossy gutless country music of today. This cd has some country elements on it without the gloss and it rocks like hell also. I would give it 10 stars if I could. Pull out the credit card and buy it!"