Search - Benjamin Britten, Geoffrey Parsons, Sarah Brightman :: The Trees They Grow So High

The Trees They Grow So High
Benjamin Britten, Geoffrey Parsons, Sarah Brightman
The Trees They Grow So High
Genres: Folk, Pop, Classical, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #1

52 minute long collection featuring 19 folk songs arranged by the late Benjamin Britten, including 'Early One Morning','Come You Not From Newcastle?' and 'Sweet Polly Oliver'. Full digital recording with Brightman accompan...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Benjamin Britten, Geoffrey Parsons, Sarah Brightman
Title: The Trees They Grow So High
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Angel Records
Release Date: 9/1/1998
Genres: Folk, Pop, Classical, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Contemporary Folk, Adult Contemporary, Easy Listening, Vocal Pop, Opera & Classical Vocal, Musicals
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 724356676923

Synopsis

Album Description
52 minute long collection featuring 19 folk songs arranged by the late Benjamin Britten, including 'Early One Morning','Come You Not From Newcastle?' and 'Sweet Polly Oliver'. Full digital recording with Brightman accompanied only by pianist Geoffrey Parsons. 1998 EMI release.

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CD Reviews

A great showcase for Sarah's exceptional tone
Anatola | NY | 01/28/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"While other people may think this collection of songs does not do Sarah's voice justice, I strongly disagree. Indeed, if anything her New Age-sounding albums (such as Luna or something or other) I find horrendous and I think they completely scatter the good qualities of her voice. Not so in this album. True, the songs here are not well-known nor are they decorated with operatic frills which Sarah has the well-known ability to perform, but there is a different beauty here, my friends. The legato, angelic quality of Sarah Brightman's voice can truly be heard in these simple melodies, light and free from the heavy chains of pulsed pop and mediocre attempts at an Enya-like portrayal. THESE songs she sings well, THIS is one of her better albums, and HERE is her beautiful sound which I missed in some of her other albums."
NOT for Brightman fanboys :)
Hat Eater | 05/14/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Guys, if you don't know, what it is - besides the obvious - don't buy it. I almost regretted the purchase and started to enjoy it only after I overcame the shock. On this LP Sarah Brightman sings English songs that were popular in the XIX century and the musical tastes changed since then rather dramatically. So check out the samples first!"
Britten would be proud!
Priscilla A. Arnold | Minneapolis, MN | 09/25/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Even more due to my idolizing of composer Benjamin Britten, than for my acclaim of Brightman as a singer, I purchased this recording. I have heard a number of recordings featuring Britten's folk songs, and this is one of the better ones.

The songs are just what they are called, folk songs. Don't expect any virtuostic singing or composing in this recording. The becautiful old songs are brought to new life by the thoughtful and sensitive singing of Brightman and the accompanying of Parsons.

If you like big and modern sounds, this is certainly not the recording for you. However, if you appreciate the diversity of Brightman and her ability to sing everything from opera to Broadway to rock, this is a perfect addition to her works.

In addition, if you are a respector of Britten's work, this is an excellent addition to your Benjamin Britten collection. The songs included are some of the more beautiful and well known of his folk songs. The vast majority of songs included are from his english language collections, and some will be well known by you even if you are only now discovering this collection of works.

For accomplished and aspiring sopranos, this is an excellent reference collection, containing a wide range of tempos, ranges and styles as well as some linguistic variances. Sarah uses a nice straight tone for the majority of the songs, with only a touch of vibratto, which is what would be the standard with these folk songs. Keeping in mind that Britten was composing during the era of lots of vibratto, he was also sensitive to the appropriate voicing of the works that he composed and arranged. I would certinaly not sing these pieces with a strong vibrato.

In addition, the phrasing and the ease of diction is an excellent representation of an artist keeping in mind the stylistic theme of the folksongs. However, in the french pieces, I would have liked to hear a bit more refinement in the voice. A small complaint, and hardly deservice of the loss of a star."