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Big Band & Quartet in Concert
Thelonious Monk
Big Band & Quartet in Concert
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #2

Arranger Hall Overton did a brilliant job of translating Thelonious Monk's distinctive compositions (and even a piano transcription) to a big band, both for an earlier Town Hall concert and for these 1963 recordings at Phi...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Thelonious Monk
Title: Big Band & Quartet in Concert
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sbme Special Mkts.
Release Date: 2/1/2008
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Modern Postbebop, Swing Jazz, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 886972405421

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
Arranger Hall Overton did a brilliant job of translating Thelonious Monk's distinctive compositions (and even a piano transcription) to a big band, both for an earlier Town Hall concert and for these 1963 recordings at Philharmonic Hall. Monk was at the peak of his belated celebrity, and he and the other musicians tear into this demanding music with a mix of authority and joyous abandon. Cornetist Thad Jones and altoist Phil Woods are among the big band's fine soloists, while Monk's regular drummer, Frankie Dunlop, is outstanding, a genuinely melodic player who could inspire the big band as well as the working quartet. --Stuart Broomer

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Member CD Reviews

Eric B. M. (Hourousiya) from APO, AP
Reviewed on 6/21/2007...
Monk's my favorite jazz composer; awesome stuph.

CD Reviews

As Good As It Gets
Richard W. Cutler | 11/14/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is, all in all, remarkably demanding music that for all its complexity swings the house down. I can only echo the praise other reviewers have heaped upon this extraordinary concert. As good as all the soloists are, Monk simply defines himself in a separate class, an orchestra unto himself. "Four In One," with its scoring of Monk's recorded solo, is the premier track, but one cannot overlook "Evidence" --one of the most remarkable minimalist compositions of modern music in any idiom-- which thrives from Monk's conclusion of his solo with the rhythmic riff picked up by the entire band. And who but Monk could resurrect "Darkness on the Delta," a song not recorded for thirty years at the time of this concert?"