Search - The Groundhogs :: Hogwash

Hogwash
The Groundhogs
Hogwash
Genres: Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1

2008 remaster of this album from the great British Blues band, originally released in 1972. Tony and the Groundhogs have released over 20 new albums and have appeared on numerous compilations and collaborations. Hogwash wa...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: The Groundhogs
Title: Hogwash
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: BGO Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 3/4/2008
Album Type: Import
Genres: Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Styles: Blues Rock, Progressive, Progressive Rock, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 5017261207876

Synopsis

Album Description
2008 remaster of this album from the great British Blues band, originally released in 1972. Tony and the Groundhogs have released over 20 new albums and have appeared on numerous compilations and collaborations. Hogwash was a creative high-point with 'Who Will Save The World?', which was a UK Top Ten entry, reaching #8 and staying in the charts for nine weeks. In the early 1960s Tony (TS) McPhee was working for Post Office Telephones and joined his work mate John Cruickshank's band, which was then called The Dollarbills. Neither liking the name or the Pop music they played, he persuaded them to start playing Blues and R&B after he had seen Cyril Davies and the All-Stars playing at the Marquee club and suggested Groundhogs as a name for the band, after a track on John Lee Hooker's album House of the Blues. 11 tracks. BGO Records.
 

CD Reviews

No Hogwash, Classic Groundhogs
Vinzo | Boston, MA United States | 03/16/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Having been lucky enough to see the Groundhogs at a festival in Pennsylvania after the "Who Can Save the World" album was released, the follow up "Hogwash" blew me and my friends away. For Groundhog fans, this was the pinnacle of greatness for T.S. McPhee, from both the songwriting and tightness of the band perspective. Been listening to this one for some thirty years now and it still sounds great: from the opener: Miss Ogny" through his James Road classic and the amazing "Sad is the Hunter", Hogwash took the best elements of Who Can Save the World, Split and Thank God... and blasted off into space. Highly recommended and then some."
Another Winner
Fred Rayworth | Las Vegas, NV United States | 03/25/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This was the missing piece of my collection of Groundhogs, slipping between Who Will Save The World and Solid.

As many have said, The Groundhogs are an acquired taste, no different than say, Motorhead. That being said, the Hogs are my taste when it comes to blues rock. Tony's no-pick guitar style is unique and fresh, and his vocals are like no other. Yeah, he'd probably not do so well on American Idol, but most likely because he can actually play an instrument besides sing. However, when it comes to his craft, there is nobody better.

I like every cut on the album, and find the style more reminiscent of Who Will Save The World (my all-time favorite) than any other Hogs album. Despite no mistaking who is playing, each Hogs album is different enough that they stand on their own.

I especially like when Tony goes off with his solos. Some may not like such extended jams, but that is something I really get into, and he does plenty of that on Hogwash. A couple of the songs here have become staples, especially I Love Miss Ogyny, 3744 James Road, Sad Is The Hunter, and Earth Shanty.

Hogwash is classic Groundhogs, and if you liked their earlier stuff, you won't be disappointed here. Highly recommended.
"
An early seventies classic
G. C. Todd | Memphis | 12/30/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album was a staple on underground fm stations in the early seventies. "Who Will Save the World" and "Thank Christ for the Bomb" are also excellent predecessors, but Hogwash is quite simply one of the greatest albums from the classic era of rock.

Although Tony McPhee's wrist injuries in '72 seriously held the band back just as they were breaking out, this album is a unique blues based progressive rock album that burned up many turntables in the early seventies. One of the standout tracks, 3744 James Road, is the story about the band flying into Memphis to stay at the home of a friend who was a disc jockey on the (then) underground station, FM100 - the same station I first heard this album on (sadly pure pop since the mid-Seventies).

I would include it in my top twenty "best but least known" albums of the early 70's."